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Sculpture

By
March 15, 2010

My sculptures, whether figurative or architectural in origin, consider surface as structure. I work with a great deal of physicality and with an uncertain and improvisational approach, the surfaces and the structures appear rough and unstable. I am concerned with the delicate balance of concealing and revealing—of making visible the gritty imperfection of improvisation and also allowing for the coded transformation that occurs by labored layers of process.

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Diana Al-Hadid was born in Aleppo, Syria, in 1981 and lives and works in Brooklyn, New York. She received her BFA in sculpture from Kent State University in Ohio (2003), an MFA in sculpture from Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond (2005), and attended the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture, Skowhegan, Maine (2007). Her work has been shown internationally including solo shows at Perry Rubenstein Gallery in New York City, and she is the recipient of the Pollock-Krasner Foundation Grant (2007) and is a New York Foundation for the Arts Fellow in Sculpture (2009). Her work will be on display from May 15th to August 15th at the UCLA Hammer Museum in Los Angeles.

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