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The Earth

By
July 15, 2009

The Earth explores China’s Inner Mongolia, where Li Wei was born. Situated on China’s northern border, Inner Mongolia is the largest grazing region in China and home to both Han Chinese and ethnic Mongolians. The traditional nomadic lifestyle of its people is being influenced by the impact of modernization; many herders no longer live in yurts and have begun to settle in towns. Meanwhile, young people often avoid traditional dress in favor of more contemporary fashions. Li Wei’s photos capture the region’s landscape as it teeters between the past and the future.

Li Wei was born in 1976 in Hohot, Inner Mongolia. He graduated from the Communication University of China in 2001. His work was included in the China Pingyao International Photography Festival and the Ankgkor Photography Festival. He lives in Beijing.

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