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Alexis Madrigal: Further Reading Recommendations from a Guernica Writer

April 19, 2011

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The world’s first nuclear reactors were fast-tracked while hailed as an economic breakthrough. By the time the public knew the truth, the atomic myth was up and running. In “Nuclear Haze,” the excerpt from Alexis Madrigal’s Powering the Dream: The History and Promise of Green Technology that appeared in Guernica, Madrigal writes about the beginnings of nuclear power, when “political leaders were more than willing to believe and promote [nuclear power’s] technical promises.” Below, Madrigal provides further reading recommendations for reminding us that nature always has the last word.

China Safari: On the Trail of Beijing’s Expansion in Africa by Serge Michel and Michel Beuret, whom Madrigal met in Angola

Another Day of Life by Ryszard Kapuscinski

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