Tag: Jonathan Lee

The Art of Independent Publishing

April 2014

The publisher of Graywolf on the pleasure of finding books others have overlooked.

Elisabeth Schmitz: Editing Under The Radar

February 2014

The vice president and editorial director of Grove Atlantic on the art of literary editing, why publishers shouldn’t turn their backs on risk-taking writing, and how the first novel she ever bought went on to transform her career.

The Useless Truth

February 2014

The National Book Award finalist on what makes a great sentence and channeling Roberto Bolaño.

A Gap in Definitions

January 2014

The award-winning Northern Irish writer on life in New York, poetry as “a way of being alone without feeling alone,” and why “all writing is political.”

Jonathan Lee: Scott Cohen’s Unfinished Ballad

December 2013

A photographer who understands Nabokov’s assertion that “imagination is a form of memory,” that as human beings we are forever recreating our own lives.

Dead Language

November 2013

The acclaimed & Sons author on the importance of entertainment, his slip into obsessive-compulsive behavior, and why he believes Salinger chose seclusion.

Talking to Ireland

September 2013

The multi-prize-winning author talks about dissecting 1970s Britain in her new book, the “loathsome” idea that motherhood is incompatible with writing, and why stutterers make good novelists.

Literary Culture Clash

July 2013

The “super-agent” talks about finding success with messy, difficult books, re-thinking how we publish works in translation, and the advice she gives to authors—no hotel porn on book tours.

Another Kind of Life

May 2013

The American writer discusses turning his back on showy prose, being labelled an “erotic” author, and “the importance of being somebody.”

Losing the Plot

April 2013

The Booker Prize nominated novelist talks about his obsession with Pynchon, history as interference, & why literary fiction needn’t forsake the pleasures of suspense.

American Utopia

March 2013

The bestselling novelist talks about the art of optimism, gender bias in the literary world, and donning public personas.