Tag: protest

Richard Falk: Two Forms of Lethal Polarization

November 2013

How polarization is poisoning Turkey and Egypt.

Michael Klare: Surviving Climate Change

November 2013

Climate change may destroy us, but not before we see a green energy revolution by the people.

After May Day

September 2013

On Occupy Wall Street’s second anniversary, revisiting the expectations and disappointments of the general strike meant to reignite the movement.

Katie Ryder: A Note to Zimmerman’s Facebook Defenders

July 2013

The problem with the “but this is the law” response.

Jennifer MacKenzie: Waiting for Ataturk

July 2013

On Taksim, tear gas, and loving a tyrant because he feeds you.

A Rioter’s Prayer

November 2012

Pussy Riot’s Yekaterina Samutsevich on protest, art, and freedom

Jen Marlowe: Terror and Teargas on the Streets of Bahrain

September 2012

Protests in Bahrain have been largely ignored in Western media, but they shouldn’t be.

Notes from the Underground

August 2012

Writer and former radical bookstore owner Sean Stewart talks about his new book on the underground press that was so vital to ’60s counterculture.

Street Art and the New Bohemian: A conversation with Eric Drooker and Molly Crabapple

July 2012

The two visual artists on the gravitas needed to make protest art, the rhetoric and representations of the Occupy movement, and how to seduce an audience by grabbing them by the eyeballs.

The Weight of the Poor

September 2011

The professor Glenn Beck loves to hate speaks with Cornel West about waitressing, black nationalism, how the radical right helped her define her politics, and why she’s gloomy about America’s future.

No “Waiting for the World to Change”

March 2007

Protest now—in a few years, you’ll be too much of a prick to care. In a few years, you’ll have your lawn and your job and whatever’s on TV tonight—everything wil seem much more important. Protest now while you still have a shred of values—the real thing to protect.

Meakin Armstrong: “Marching” Against the War in DC and NYC

January 2007

Then you march, which means that you promenade toward the capitol, then around its back, ending up where you’d started in the first place.