Category Archives: Home Featured

Negin Farsad Is Just Like All of You

Written on November 7, 2016 at 12:03 am, by

The social justice comedian on her embarrassing patriotism, bringing public policy to the stage, and making white people laugh.

Louder Than Bombs

Written on November 7, 2016 at 12:02 am, by

Photographs of war from the border of Turkey and Syria.

Fourth Algorithm

Written on November 7, 2016 at 12:01 am, by

"I have trouble naming myself / In a language I can find."

The Clown and the Caliphate

Written on November 3, 2016 at 12:05 am, by

Encounters with a man so bizarre ISIS wouldn't keep him.

House Girl

Written on November 3, 2016 at 12:04 am, by

I wasn’t allowed to enter Grace’s room when she was not at home, so I had to make haste.

The People Behind the Polls

Written on November 3, 2016 at 12:03 am, by

A photographer crosses state lines and ideological borders to talk to voters on the eve of America's presidential election.

When Ann Patchett Is Emperor

Written on November 3, 2016 at 12:02 am, by

The writer on America’s fear culture, bookstores as community builders, and why writers should care about their character more than their characters.

The Boat Rocker

Written on October 17, 2016 at 12:02 am, by

Don’t smile like that. I’m telling you the truth.

Power Tools

Written on October 3, 2016 at 12:01 am, by

They held hands. They put their feet in the water. I love him, Corey told herself.

Bird (on back)

Written on July 1, 2016 at 12:02 am, by

At daybreak, a bird flew into our bedroom, smacked the wall mirror, and fell on Darla’s back. She slept on.

Cities of the Future

Written on June 15, 2016 at 12:08 am, by

The Future of Cities: Ten writers on the places they immigrated from, returned to, remember, call home.

Women, Winning

Written on June 15, 2016 at 12:07 am, by

The Future of Cities: The journalist and She Shapes the City co-founder on the women behind Nairobi’s rapidly changing identity.

A Changeless Place

Written on June 15, 2016 at 12:05 am, by

The Future of Cities: The artist on his portraits of disaster, invoking empathy, and Godzilla as “the loneliest guy in the world.”

Friend of the Indians

Written on June 15, 2016 at 12:03 am, by

The Future of Cities: “There are hundreds, perhaps a thousand empty villages in Spain like your Valdaves: abandoned, then forgotten. I find them new owners...”

Migrant Is Not a Metaphor

Written on June 15, 2016 at 12:01 am, by

The Future of Cities: A migrant learns to love as mothers do, / by trying and trying again.

Brooklyn Bound

Written on June 1, 2016 at 12:06 am, by

The fight to extradite El Chapo.

A Second Start

Written on June 1, 2016 at 12:05 am, by

The Danish filmmaker discusses refugee children in Denmark, the safety of schools, and the quiet power of the observer.

I Am A Rock

Written on June 1, 2016 at 12:03 am, by

Whenever the latest woe is me commercial came on hawking the newest painkiller, Mami commanded our attention: “That’s me!”

Let’s Not Begin

Written on June 1, 2016 at 12:01 am, by

Worry and console, worry / and console: it’s how I stay / in shape.

Never the End

Written on May 16, 2016 at 12:08 am, by

“When you approach the second half of your life, you start to unconsciously consider what you’re passing on.”

Kiss of Death

Written on May 16, 2016 at 12:07 am, by

What does a neglected disease tell us about who we choose to take care of and why?

Touch the Tile

Written on May 16, 2016 at 12:05 am, by

The artist discusses sewn paintings, tiled murals, and viewer inhibitions.

Shut Your Mouth, Hélène

Written on May 16, 2016 at 12:04 am, by

‘Keep your pecker in your pocket, Paddy,’ Jacques Aubry says, pointing at Mrs. Boyle’s swollen front, ‘and you’ll have less need for marching.’

Rutting Season

Written on May 16, 2016 at 12:03 am, by

He lay in the dark, eyes closed, imagining what Lisa would say when she saw the gun. Would she beg?

Asylum

Written on May 16, 2016 at 12:01 am, by

They said burn the keys / but only our hair caught fire.

Forget You’re Watching a Play

Written on May 2, 2016 at 12:07 am, by

The director of Eclipsed on bringing the first all-female production to Broadway.

A Slight Risk

Written on May 2, 2016 at 12:06 am, by

An American pregnancy in Manila.

At Soil Level

Written on May 2, 2016 at 12:05 am, by

The visual artist on working with seeds and seeing the world anew.

Manifesto

Written on May 2, 2016 at 12:03 am, by

“My brave little Marxist,” she will coo, knowing that her own, modest attempts at domestic revolution will as usual come to nothing, and softening in spite of it.

She Walked In / She Walked Out

Written on May 2, 2016 at 12:01 am, by

Whatever you touched grew more like itself

My Father’s Aleppo

Written on April 15, 2016 at 12:08 am, by

An exodus, a return, and the questions that follow.

Upending the Archive

Written on April 15, 2016 at 12:07 am, by

The genre-bending writer on queering history and restoring lost voices to American fiction.

Lovely Decorative Tentacles

Written on April 15, 2016 at 12:05 am, by

The little-known book illustrations of Henri Matisse.

Migrations

Written on April 15, 2016 at 12:03 am, by

Bulgarians are physical people. I discovered that when I left and came to New York.

How Easy to Live with Choice

Written on April 15, 2016 at 12:01 am, by

Oh it’s / a gold rush of expectations this place.

Running Still

Written on April 1, 2016 at 12:07 am, by

Obsession as symptom, cause, and cure.

The Full Texture of a City

Written on April 1, 2016 at 12:06 am, by

India's premier graphic novelist on street hustlers and the perils of cosmopolitanism.

A Bridged Country

Written on April 1, 2016 at 12:03 am, by

It wasn’t like we hadn’t grown accustomed to male wooers after Pa danced his way out of the picture, but something about Casero, that old bag, pissed me off.

Hyel’s Zumbi

Written on April 1, 2016 at 12:01 am, by

Call his neck plum, when it bruises / say the skin makes it easy to digest.

Distant Brains

Written on March 15, 2016 at 12:09 am, by

Future of Language: Scientists are experimenting with ways for people to communicate using only their minds. But at what cost?

Living in a Briefcase House

Written on March 15, 2016 at 12:08 am, by

Future of Language: The architect discusses the language of aesthetics and telling a story through a body of work.

The Footsteps of Dance Poetry

Written on March 15, 2016 at 12:05 am, by

Future of Language: Our human identity has been described as atoms dancing, a living poem, a moving message…

Snow Signs

Written on March 15, 2016 at 12:03 am, by

Future of Language: Your given signs and pairs: mouth, kisses, red-pink, drink-apple, hurry-go. You have no tenses, only momentum into what’s before you.

Twentieth-First Century

Written on March 15, 2016 at 12:01 am, by

Future of Language: I vote with my feet. I vote with my wallet. / I vote in person with my vote.

Mother is Marxist

Written on March 1, 2016 at 12:07 am, by

The market scans my child, calculates pecuniary value.

Bodies of Revolution

Written on March 1, 2016 at 12:06 am, by

Female leaders from around the globe trade notes on building a new women’s solidarity movement.

The Wealth of Nations

Written on March 1, 2016 at 12:05 am, by

Nigerian artist Victor Ehikhamenor fills oil drums with the trauma of national memory.

The Vertical Frontier

Written on March 1, 2016 at 12:03 am, by

I could tell that he preferred each and every stranger, even strangers he had not met yet, even strangers he imagined, he preferred those strangers to me.

Hera, Say Hello

Written on March 1, 2016 at 12:02 am, by

Why, among this applause, 
/ have I become so small in this life

There’s no such thing as a free symphony

Written on March 1, 2016 at 12:01 am, by

We reap / such risky skills from childhood

Istanbul’s Wandering Songbirds

Written on February 15, 2016 at 12:10 am, by

Street vendors are outlaws by definition.

What We Owe History

Written on February 15, 2016 at 12:09 am, by

“An essay is something that tracks the evolution of the human mind.”

Deadly Decisions

Written on February 15, 2016 at 12:07 am, by

The authors of The Good Death and Five Days at Memorial discuss disaster preparedness, impossible health care choices, and the notion of journalistic objectivity.

Remembering Leila Alaoui

Written on February 15, 2016 at 12:05 am, by

The work and lasting legacy of the young photographer killed in the Burkina Faso terrorist attack.

High Dive

Written on February 15, 2016 at 12:04 am, by

Male staff members at the Grand waded through the myths that surrounded her, enjoying the feeling of being stuck.

the underworld

Written on February 15, 2016 at 12:02 am, by

your sad eyes are a river / the locals know not to swim

Up in Arms

Written on February 1, 2016 at 12:09 am, by

The artist and journalist on reporting from Guantánamo Bay and Syria, glamor as a subversive power, and neutrality and boredom as weapons of the state.

To Anyang

Written on February 1, 2016 at 12:08 am, by

Lost for words in the cradle of Chinese civilization.

Female Gazing

Written on February 1, 2016 at 12:05 am, by

The artist on primal super identities, photographing migrants, and motherhood as a source of creative power.

Man on the Bus with a Spider on His Back

Written on February 1, 2016 at 12:03 am, by

There's a man on the bus sitting directly in front of you. He has a small brown spider crawling across his red shirt, near his left shoulder blade.

White Boy Time Machine: Software

Written on February 1, 2016 at 12:01 am, by

b u t w h e r e a r e y o u r e a l l y f r o m ? / yesterday is the wrong answer, tomorrow too

The Nostalgia Aesthetic

Written on January 15, 2016 at 12:08 am, by

How the “Keep Calm and Carry On” poster became a global design icon.

Slow Burn

Written on January 15, 2016 at 12:07 am, by

The Philippine cinema pioneer on why films are “the greatest mirror of humanity’s struggle.”

Material Effects

Written on January 15, 2016 at 12:05 am, by

The artists on cultural appropriation, performance as participation, and the struggle with modernity.

Square Wave

Written on January 15, 2016 at 12:03 am, by

It seared their eyes. Squinting, they watched the light dilate, divide in six. The rocket fell away, limp, useless, and dark as a new star grew against the storm.

Lessons on Expulsion

Written on January 15, 2016 at 12:01 am, by

This grain, this / wild greedy thing

Returning to Ethiopia

Written on December 15, 2015 at 12:09 am, by

Boundaries of Nations: Exile had long since ceased to be a temporary condition, but what I hadn’t known was that, like love, it could deepen with time.

Children of War

Written on December 15, 2015 at 12:06 am, by

Boundaries of Nations: The author and activist on growing up under siege in Sarajevo and chronicling the childhood memories of other survivors.

Locating Cuba

Written on December 15, 2015 at 12:05 am, by

Boundaries of Nations: The scholar and author on Cuban contemporary art and how changing US-Cuba diplomacy may impact the art world.

Shakespeare, New Mexico

Written on December 15, 2015 at 12:03 am, by

Boundaries of Nations: With time, I learned to love and master my scenes.

Love American-Made/ Your Toy Ode:Us

Written on December 15, 2015 at 12:01 am, by

Boundaries of Nations: The heart I hide behind the hood: / always speeding hot, too / easily interstated.

The Book Lady of Kabul

Written on December 1, 2015 at 12:07 am, by

Block by block she maneuvers through the teeming sidewalks of Kabul’s Shar-E-Naw shopping district until she enters Ice-Milk Restaurant, stops at tables.

The Future Perfect

Written on December 1, 2015 at 12:06 am, by

The novelist on what atheists and true believers have in common and how Mark Twain, Henry James, and “Sigmund-fucking-Freud” lack imagination.

Faith Need Not Fear Reason

Written on December 1, 2015 at 12:05 am, by

The artist on his current New York solo exhibition, inspired by the religious coexistence of a more peaceful era.

Souterrain

Written on December 1, 2015 at 12:03 am, by

He led her away, down one tunnel, then another. He took her through a passage where the bones were piled so high they had to wriggle over them on their bellies.

The Parable of the Wayward Child

Written on December 1, 2015 at 12:01 am, by

All her life as if / she in a race with ruin.

Life as We Write It

Written on November 16, 2015 at 12:08 am, by

The author on what evolutionary science can teach us about art and literature, his enduring interest in Nabokov, and why a good joke never dies.

Surrealist Visions

Written on November 16, 2015 at 12:05 am, by

Three contemporary Egyptian artists take the self as subject in exploring post-revolution politics.

The Road to Alpullu

Written on November 16, 2015 at 12:04 am, by

I would examine the black and white photographs of Alpullu’s golden age. In their shadows, I identified the vanished town.

I From Absolute Solitude

Written on November 16, 2015 at 12:01 am, by

I believe they are many, and some are beautiful and deserve to live.

An Art Without an Artwork

Written on November 2, 2015 at 12:07 am, by

A summer of chess in Bryant Park.

Drawing Dissent

Written on November 2, 2015 at 12:06 am, by

The political cartoonist on his new biography of Edward Snowden and living in an Orwellian age.

Radical Realism

Written on November 2, 2015 at 12:05 am, by

An exhibition at the Jewish Museum brings together a group of largely unknown artists creating provocative and unexpected work.

The Things They Carried

Written on November 2, 2015 at 12:03 am, by

They needed a way to keep the fire going until morning—that was another thing they had on their minds.

Art

Written on November 2, 2015 at 12:01 am, by

Everything is art / to be broken.

Death of a Valley

Written on October 15, 2015 at 12:07 am, by

In 1953, California sacrificed a town to stave its own thirst. But the act was futile, and the state is thirstier than ever.

The Afterlife of Waste

Written on October 15, 2015 at 12:06 am, by

The Turkish artist on moving to the epicenter of throwaway culture and imagining the life-forms that “might emerge out of the contemporary ooze.”

No Noise, Only Sound

Written on October 15, 2015 at 12:05 am, by

The late avant-garde composer’s Diary offers his musings on politics, prose, and the strange condition of being human.

Lifesavers

Written on October 15, 2015 at 12:03 am, by

When I met G I knew he’d figure in my life heavily, but I had no idea if our association would be sad or happy, ultimately—and I still don’t know which it will be, ultimately.

Sita Considers Her Rebellions

Written on October 15, 2015 at 12:01 am, by

She has killed things / (though it is forbidden) with her hands

The Author Is Purely a Name

Written on October 1, 2015 at 12:07 am, by

Fragments on writing, publishing, and being an anonymous worldwide phenomenon.

Drawing From Life and Death

Written on October 1, 2015 at 12:06 am, by

The graphic novelist on coming of age in his comics, portraying Asian-American characters, and laying bare the anxieties of fatherhood.

The Shark’s Fin

Written on October 1, 2015 at 12:05 am, by

A new documentary follows three climbers up one of the world’s most challenging peaks to explore the depths of commitment, passion, and calculated risk.

A Bunch of Savages

Written on October 1, 2015 at 12:03 am, by

I have a birthmark above my butt, which is undeniable proof of gypsiness.

Whatever We Name, We Exceed

Written on October 1, 2015 at 12:01 am, by

these things I try to name each day / were never mine to lose.

At Home in the Universe

Written on September 15, 2015 at 12:06 am, by

Boundaries of Nature: The scientist and writer on gender bias in the sciences and inventing new geometric forms through crochet.

The Unknowing

Written on September 15, 2015 at 12:05 am, by

Boundaries of Nature: The visual artist on the landscape of her native Canada, exhibiting at a nuclear power plant, and seeking to destabilize the familiar.

The Last of His Kind

Written on September 15, 2015 at 12:03 am, by

Boundaries of Nature: In books, he has read about boys and animals, how they form a connection, and then the animal dies. And the boy learns something about the harshness of the world.

The World’s Oldest Cherry Tree Is Alive and Well but Barely Able to Walk

Written on September 15, 2015 at 12:01 am, by

Boundaries of Nature: Underfoot, / the spring grass was an animal whose fur must never be cut.

History Is Who You’ve Lost

Written on September 1, 2015 at 12:08 am, by

I, without knowing, dreamed parts of a truth. One part is this: my grandfather on my mother’s side was a murderer. Or was he?

In the Fictions of Our Past

Written on September 1, 2015 at 12:06 am, by

The authors discuss mourning in memoir and whether dreams belong in literature.

A Battle in Images

Written on September 1, 2015 at 12:05 am, by

Political posters and propaganda on view at LACMA shed light on a tumultuous period in Germany’s history, when art served as a catalyst for change.

The Boy from Petrópolis

Written on September 1, 2015 at 12:03 am, by

I look at his face; the green eyes, the wet mouth. I still feel the dream-softness of his hair under my hands; I feel like a grandmother, like a mother, like a lover.

Army SMART Book Section 1-8: “The origin of the hand salute is uncertain.”

Written on September 1, 2015 at 12:01 am, by

Prove you’re mammalian by twisting / your neck a mere 160 degrees, / 180 if you’re under 30.

Reintroductions and Other Translocations

Written on August 17, 2015 at 12:09 am, by

The water had been empty and now was full. This felt like what we should be doing with our human urge to meddle in natural affairs.

We Can Try to Be Human

Written on August 17, 2015 at 12:08 am, by

The Israeli author on the dramatic family histories that fuel his work and the broken promises of his homeland.

Music Meant to Change the World

Written on August 17, 2015 at 12:05 am, by

Folk City at the Museum of the City of New York dives into the politics and nostalgia of New York’s folk revival.

The Vase

Written on August 17, 2015 at 12:03 am, by

I didn’t tell my husband, but there was a part of me that could have lived like that: eating cockroaches in the dirt, catching flies.

White

Written on August 17, 2015 at 12:01 am, by

I do not / write about you for you / are not washed out.

Woven

Written on August 3, 2015 at 12:09 am, by

Every story I have ever told has a kind of breach to it, I think. You could say that my writing isn’t quite right. That all the beginnings have endings in them.

Waving, Not Drowning

Written on August 3, 2015 at 12:07 am, by

The New Yorker writer on the politics of surfing, reporting from war zones, and the “weird genre” of memoir.

Breaking the Silence

Written on August 3, 2015 at 12:06 am, by

Zanele Muholi’s stirring portraits of South Africa’s LGTBQI community.

The Sum of Small Acts

Written on August 3, 2015 at 12:04 am, by

They agreed to unspoken rules. Broken windows were OK. Broken bones were fair game. Graffiti was acceptable, as were rubber bullets and tear gas.

I Go for a Walk in the Evening While the Body Stays at Home

Written on August 3, 2015 at 12:01 am, by

The body unbuckles the door latch / and stands behind the screen.

The Rhino’s Last Stand

Written on July 15, 2015 at 12:09 am, by

Is domestication a final hope for the world’s rhinos?

In Full Flight

Written on July 15, 2015 at 12:06 am, by

The writer and naturalist on the temporality of grief, inhabiting the voice of T.H. White, and developing radical empathy with a goshawk.

I Share, Therefore I Am

Written on July 15, 2015 at 12:05 am, by

Artist Mónika Sziládi examines the digital self.

The Americanist

Written on July 15, 2015 at 12:03 am, by

“I’m celebrating my country! Stop hating my freedom, you terrorist.”

Preface to a Twenty-Volume Regicide Note

Written on July 15, 2015 at 12:01 am, by

Give me the names // of the slain. Say each name / like benediction.

Meakin Armstrong: Love’s Not Bulletproof

Written on June 23, 2015 at 9:01 am, by

A white Charlestonian says the recent shooting at Emanuel A.M.E. church is the inevitable outcome of white privilege.

Death Is a Way to Be

Written on June 15, 2015 at 12:07 am, by

Boundaries of Taste: If we dance around our dead in New Orleans, it is because we have to.

Laugh Lines

Written on June 15, 2015 at 12:06 am, by

Boundaries of Taste: The comedian on her radical education and the importance of safe spaces in the “hostile and dangerous world” of joke-making.

The People’s Pervert

Written on June 15, 2015 at 12:05 am, by

Boundaries of Taste: The filmmaker and artist on the evolution of bad taste.

Canticle for Gigi Sauvageau

Written on June 15, 2015 at 12:03 am, by

Boundaries of Taste: Where we saw shape, line, and shadow—a nude—he saw a naked overweight woman.

horror vacui

Written on June 15, 2015 at 12:01 am, by

Boundaries of Taste: stop & the Devil will push the Devil will be in me reborn

How to Teach a Nightmare

Written on June 1, 2015 at 12:07 am, by

When I find out that Galway Kinnell has passed away, I will read The Book of Nightmares in a library, tears coating my face like sweat.

A Safe Distance

Written on June 1, 2015 at 12:06 am, by

The writer on myth-making as a means to confront the realities of modern-day slavery.

A Failure of Memory

Written on June 1, 2015 at 12:05 am, by

Three photographs chronicle the devastation surrounding the war against apartheid in South Africa.

Pretty Is

Written on June 1, 2015 at 12:03 am, by

Only then can you forgive a girl for being pretty: if she’s an idiot or a liar.

waiting room

Written on June 1, 2015 at 12:01 am, by

you carry a heavier and heavier bag / and always feel it belongs to someone else

Unwanted Alive

Written on May 15, 2015 at 12:09 am, by

Since changes to US immigration law in the ’90s, many veterans are being deported.

A Dangerous Language

Written on May 15, 2015 at 12:06 am, by

The Kurdish filmmaker on deploying a camera rather than a gun to fight for his community.

Shifting States

Written on May 15, 2015 at 12:05 am, by

What can two portraits of President-elect Muhammadu Buhari, taken three decades apart, tell us about Nigeria’s political climate?

A Boy My Sister Dated in High School

Written on May 15, 2015 at 12:03 am, by

When the boy she was dating hit my sister, it made a sharp cracking sound, just like it does in the movies.

The Self Forgives Little of Itself

Written on May 15, 2015 at 12:01 am, by

it’s as if the knuckle of tomorrow / has arrived today

Mythic Retreat

Written on May 1, 2015 at 12:07 am, by

The Booker Prize-winning author on samurai sword fights, the trouble with literary allusion, and the fabled world of post-Arthurian England.

The War of Forgetting

Written on May 1, 2015 at 12:06 am, by

Inspired by Eduardo Galeano, the discovery that all wars—personal, territorial, political—have afterlives in our grief and memory.

Jesus Days

Written on May 1, 2015 at 12:05 am, by

A photographer's images of a contented but closeted youth.

I’ll Die and Be Right There

Written on May 1, 2015 at 12:04 am, by

He told them about the Internet, Steam, Apple, and Microsoft, which were the other names of Satan.

The Door

Written on May 1, 2015 at 12:01 am, by

Where are you Salma? Little ache / of sky.

Iowa Pastoral

Written on April 15, 2015 at 12:07 am, by

Unintended lessons from the acclaimed American writing program.

In Defense Of

Written on April 15, 2015 at 12:06 am, by

The “people’s lawyer” on her most controversial criminal defense cases—including the one that sent her to prison.

Raw Nerve

Written on April 15, 2015 at 12:05 am, by

The New Yorker’s art editor on learning English through imagery, comics as cultural barometer, and collaborating with Art Spiegelman.

Long Forgotten

Written on April 15, 2015 at 12:03 am, by

He did not want her to think what might possibly be true: that he was going mad.

Roots

Written on April 15, 2015 at 12:01 am, by

I envied them in silence / because they were starting something.

The Tiger

Written on April 1, 2015 at 12:09 am, by

A Burmese poet and activist revisits the years of his incarceration, while urging change in a country that does not yet feel free.

Built for Humans

Written on April 1, 2015 at 12:07 am, by

The sociologist on the role of the artist in gentrification, challenges to affordable housing, and the commodification of New York City’s loft lifestyle.

This Huge Equilibrium

Written on April 1, 2015 at 12:05 am, by

On director Wim Wenders’s documentary The Salt of the Earth, a look at the career and conservation efforts of photographer Sebastião Salgado.

In the Dim Below

Written on April 1, 2015 at 12:03 am, by

Our parents were too busy launching bombs over the river to notice missing fingers.

Carib Woman, 1818

Written on April 1, 2015 at 12:01 am, by

I am burning in this life / and the next.

Girl

Written on March 16, 2015 at 12:08 am, by

Boundaries of Gender: Sometimes you don’t know who you are until you put on a mask.

Inflections Forever New

Written on March 16, 2015 at 12:07 am, by

Boundaries of Gender: The poet and cultural critic on the politics of motherhood and the expansive potential of the queer movement.

Inside / Outside

Written on March 16, 2015 at 12:05 am, by

Boundaries of Gender: The artist discusses refugee trauma, female oppression, and her new show, How Iraqi Are You?

Subcortical

Written on March 16, 2015 at 12:03 am, by

Boundaries of Gender: In the early seventies, I began sleeping with a married doctor who wanted to cure homosexuality.

The Body

Written on March 16, 2015 at 12:01 am, by

Boundaries of Gender: Because people you know sometimes cut theirs
 / off so as not to look like you.

Fieldwork

Written on March 2, 2015 at 12:08 am, by

Lost and found in the femicide regions of the US-Mexico border.

The Art Of Agenting

Written on March 2, 2015 at 12:06 am, by

The literary agent on gatekeeping, the truth behind big advances, and why Amazon neglects the “humanity to good books.”

Buffalo Magic

Written on March 2, 2015 at 12:05 am, by

Plains Indians, Painted Hides, and the De-Wilding of the American West

My Dreams Would Seem So Close

Written on March 2, 2015 at 12:03 am, by

“They’re back!” we hissed over our kitchen fences. “Someone’s got to stop them! Something must be done!”

Dominion

Written on March 2, 2015 at 12:01 am, by

A mandrake quickens / into greed-grab, tears a page / from Genesis.

Mitigating the Silence

Written on February 16, 2015 at 12:07 am, by

The author couldn’t find a single press in the world devoted to publishing African poetry. So he created one.

The Rabbit Slaughter

Written on February 16, 2015 at 12:06 am, by

An anthropologist examines the meanings of sacrifice and slaughter—with his own life as the case study.

The Perfect Beat

Written on February 16, 2015 at 12:05 am, by

Canonizing and continuing DJ Afrika Bambaataa’s hip-hop legacy

Stormbringer

Written on February 16, 2015 at 12:03 am, by

I met Tracy Pasco in the spring of 1980—in my Pennsylvania hometown, a time of relative optimism and ease.

Halfway Through Life

Written on February 16, 2015 at 12:01 am, by

We who crossed paths with the bomber / and lived the whole afternoon through.

My Asylum

Written on February 2, 2015 at 12:07 am, by

After more than a century, Britain’s notorious asylums were slated for closure. Where does that leave the people they actually healed?

Just to Tell the Truth

Written on February 2, 2015 at 12:06 am, by

The journalist and teacher on a century of muckrakers, the pleasures and perils of reporting, and the golden age of investigative journalism.

Slowly, and With Much Expression

Written on February 2, 2015 at 12:05 am, by

Alec Soth’s Songbook.

The Infernal

Written on February 2, 2015 at 12:03 am, by

"I consider myself a casualty, one of the many casualties of the war on terror." —Alberto Gonzales

Terrorists Speak in Strange Languages

Written on February 2, 2015 at 12:01 am, by

I lock my tongue / even though I’ve prayed / in Persian for a thousand years.

What the Trees Reveal

Written on January 15, 2015 at 12:07 am, by

When we moved to the Ella Valley, my partner and I took great care not to build on land that might have belonged to Palestinians before the war of 1948.

The Hollywood Blacklist, Revisited

Written on January 15, 2015 at 12:06 am, by

The filmmaker and scholar on the radical legacy of American Communist film.

Before the Eclipse

Written on January 15, 2015 at 12:05 am, by

The photographer’s recent images of Havana.

Other Cities

Written on January 15, 2015 at 12:03 am, by

There were so many places he could have lived, but he lived in the shack so he could dream of his daughter.

Rats

Written on January 15, 2015 at 12:01 am, by

It is a rat world. / You only live to keep them out / or on the way.

God’s Creation Is Running a Fever

Written on December 15, 2014 at 12:10 am, by

Religion in America: The climate scientist on denialism and why her evangelical faith demands action.

Of This Time

Written on December 15, 2014 at 12:05 am, by

Religion in America: The artist discusses Hinduism in the diaspora, religious imagery, and her new show, Eyes of Time.

Household Gods

Written on December 15, 2014 at 12:03 am, by

Religion in America: The house of the Memory God is filled with junk in piles. It started innocently enough, the way a blizzard starts: a flake here, a flake there.

God suspected my heart was a geode but he had to make sure

Written on December 15, 2014 at 12:01 am, by

Religion in America: good, God said, I took clouds and planted them / in soft, red clay.

The Everyday Extraordinary

Written on December 1, 2014 at 12:06 am, by

The poet and curator on expanding autobiography, the importance of elegy, and the centrality of blues to experience.

Documentary Film and the Pleasure Principle

Written on December 1, 2014 at 12:05 am, by

Reflections on Les Blank.

Butterflies in November

Written on December 1, 2014 at 12:03 am, by

You’ll barely notice him, he won’t nag or pester you, doesn’t even sing the way other kids do.

Hopper’s Women

Written on December 1, 2014 at 12:01 am, by

she, standing there now with all the immodest strength / of a clapboard house, who has not even asked for this light.

After the Green Death

Written on November 17, 2014 at 12:08 am, by

At the top of the pantheon of spirits in Burma are the Thirty-Seven Nats. Twirling on earth, in a shimmering shawl, is their 74-year-old medium, U Nan Win.

Salvaged Crossings

Written on November 17, 2014 at 12:06 am, by

Unearthing the stories of “coolie women”—early-twentieth-century indentured laborers shipped from India to work on sugar plantations across the colonial world.

The Self-Portraits of Samuel Fosso

Written on November 17, 2014 at 12:05 am, by

Examining identity through costume, impersonation, and performance.

Seven Micro-Stories on War (and Only One on Love)

Written on November 17, 2014 at 12:03 am, by

We reported on the two-way radio that the only nut alive asked to surrender.

Said Gun Sleeps

Written on November 17, 2014 at 12:01 am, by

I’d sleep against the wall in the unemployment line / next to men who slit throats in another country

The Junk Trade

Written on November 3, 2014 at 12:07 am, by

I could still feel his touch, and each time I thought about his truck I felt guilty.

Verses of Love and War

Written on November 3, 2014 at 12:06 am, by

The writer on the faces of violence in conflict zones, and why poetry offers a form of liberation that journalism cannot.

The Darling Duck

Written on November 3, 2014 at 12:05 am, by

One of many recipes inspired by centuries of yearning for the eternal duck.

Stand Still

Written on November 3, 2014 at 12:03 am, by

We realize, of course, that one day the force may strike again, leaving one of us breathless at the side of the road.

Luz

Written on November 3, 2014 at 12:01 am, by

If, in the church, there was blood / her blood was colorless

We Wear the Mask

Written on October 15, 2014 at 12:06 am, by

The writer on coming of age in dichotomous Baltimore and being warned against writing about race.

In the Prison of New Beginnings

Written on October 15, 2014 at 12:05 am, by

In the South’s bloodiest prisons, Baptists say they can reform prisoners by turning them into missionaries.

Choosing Their Histories

Written on October 15, 2014 at 12:04 am, by

The curator discusses her preference for non-linear perspectives and truly independent thinkers.

Ghost House

Written on October 15, 2014 at 12:03 am, by

The stories of the kidnapped always begin the same way.

Elegy With Agency

Written on October 15, 2014 at 12:02 am, by

You can no more waterboard yourself / than sneak up on yourself at a party

The Rise and Fall of Public Housing in NYC

Written on October 1, 2014 at 12:11 am, by

American Empires: A subjective overview.

Pull Back to Reveal

Written on October 1, 2014 at 12:06 am, by

American Empires: The privacy advocate and legal advisor to Edward Snowden on today’s surveillance empire.

How Small It Actually Is

Written on October 1, 2014 at 12:05 am, by

American Empires: The art critic and activist discusses the power structures of the art empire.

For What Purpose?

Written on October 1, 2014 at 12:04 am, by

American Empires: I wanted to stop something, everything. I applied for a job in airport security and they placed me here.

Nachtmusik

Written on October 1, 2014 at 12:01 am, by

American Empires: If they sing will she barb them my love in her eating dress

Freedom Mandate

Written on September 15, 2014 at 12:07 am, by

When the religious right co-opts the push to reinvigorate civics education, dubious legislation reveals the most powerful people in public schools.

How Does It End?

Written on September 15, 2014 at 12:06 am, by

The debut novelist and former Jehovah’s Witness on being a child preacher, leaving the church, and the safety of a good book.

Birds in Flight

Written on September 15, 2014 at 12:05 am, by

In NEGROGOTHIC: A Manifesto, The Aesthetics of M. Lamar, the artist re-envisions historical narratives to break open the present.

You, Disappearing

Written on September 15, 2014 at 12:03 am, by

The apocalypse was quiet. It had a way about it, a certain charm. It could be called graceful. It was taking a long time.

Adelle Steals the Key To

Written on September 15, 2014 at 12:02 am, by

I carried our wedding china out to the dock, threw every goblet into the ocean.

Medicine and Its Metaphors

Written on September 2, 2014 at 12:11 am, by

A mother confronts the waning paternalism of doctors and comes to terms with needing the care of others.

A Tripartite Drama

Written on September 2, 2014 at 12:10 am, by

The Pulitzer Prize-winning writer mines the ongoing resonance of the Camp David Accords, on stage and on the page.

Some Otherside, Some Subterranean

Written on September 2, 2014 at 12:09 am, by

Our guest poetry editor selects poems that sit on "the knife edge between what we call the everyday and what we call the night."

Outlaw’s Territory

Written on September 2, 2014 at 12:07 am, by

Disregarding Hunter S. Thompson’s advice, Danny Lyon set off to “record and glorify the life of the American bikerider.”

Our Fathers

Written on September 2, 2014 at 12:06 am, by

I don’t remember the trial, of course, but I’m told there was a stink of hatred in the room that would undo your tie.

I Said Infantry

Written on August 15, 2014 at 12:07 am, by

An Army sergeant reflects on his service in Iraq and how his family’s history with PTSD led him to sign up in the first place.

Night Vision

Written on August 15, 2014 at 12:06 am, by

The acclaimed novelist on the secrets, dreams, and myths that fuel her storytelling.

Layers of Truth

Written on August 15, 2014 at 12:04 am, by

The novelist and visual artist discuss their collaborative work “The Mastermind y lo contrario.”

The Bully of Order

Written on August 15, 2014 at 12:03 am, by

Bigness required bound­aries but this water had none save the shore we stood upon and the end of my eyeball’s reach.

The Unfinished

Written on August 15, 2014 at 12:01 am, by

When we returned by a pinprick in darkness / we found ourselves in childhood

Felt Not Known

Written on August 1, 2014 at 12:08 am, by

The novelist on mythic creatures, horror stories, and sensory maladies.

Prison Journal of a Child Bride

Written on August 1, 2014 at 12:07 am, by

At times I wonder whether they considered me a human being or a lamb to sacrifice for their own good.

Scenes From a Contemporary Arab World

Written on August 1, 2014 at 12:05 am, by

The curator on the New Museum exhibition Here and Elsewhere.

Girls

Written on August 1, 2014 at 12:03 am, by

Girls, the man said, I’ve got an itch.

DNA

Written on August 1, 2014 at 12:02 am, by

you’re nothing, / absolutely nothing, / but a Palestinian.

Going Underground

Written on July 15, 2014 at 12:09 am, by

Rock bands, the academy as subculture, and staving off the crisis in the humanities.

Small Rebellions

Written on July 15, 2014 at 12:08 am, by

The civil rights icon on Detroit, the limits of protest organizing, and what she’s learned over seven decades of activism.

The Unlearning

Written on July 15, 2014 at 12:05 am, by

A New York-based Brazilian writer considers her country’s unrest through the work of performance artist Paulo Bruscky.

2 A.M. at the Cat’s Pajamas

Written on July 15, 2014 at 12:03 am, by

Boys cross rooms for Georgie, who is full in the way they like. Foxy is the word for it, Sarina thinks, whereas she is foxless.

Gate 134

Written on July 15, 2014 at 12:02 am, by

What unnameable would throw this on the floor, / noon refracted through blue windows

Class in America: The Fault Lines

Written on June 16, 2014 at 12:12 am, by

A Guernica special issue.

Servings of Small Change

Written on June 16, 2014 at 12:10 am, by

The food writers on building a food movement that transcends class lines.

Sight Lines

Written on June 16, 2014 at 12:05 am, by

The iconic graphic designer on personal responsibility, the dangers of corporate branding, and the power of art to bridge social divides.

Who Can Shave Thirteen Times a Day

Written on June 16, 2014 at 12:03 am, by

“I brushed Michael Bolton’s hair once,” I said, “and moisturized George Clooney too.”

Temporary People

Written on June 16, 2014 at 12:02 am, by

Gin means you start down south and diesel / dye your stripper, that International Harvester, / through barbed wire

Land of Milk and Money

Written on June 2, 2014 at 12:07 am, by

Is Tech 2.0 boon or bust for quality of life in the Bay Area? A tourist investigates.

This Little Light of Ours

Written on June 2, 2014 at 12:06 am, by

The Freedom Summer director on Mississippi and the role of music in civil rights.

Number 7, a Slice of Heaven

Written on June 2, 2014 at 12:05 am, by

In Bowls Balls Souls Holes, artist Mika Rottenberg imagines the hidden machinations of luck.

Waterborne

Written on June 2, 2014 at 12:03 am, by

They had never been this far out in the lake, this lost, this on their own.

Refugee (Baghdad 2003)

Written on June 2, 2014 at 12:02 am, by

Daughter, your mother’s prayer teeth would sharpen / and shred your opaque sack of sleep.

Myth Is a Theorem About the Nature of Reality

Written on May 15, 2014 at 12:09 am, by

The scholar on the vivid tradition of Haida poetry.

Fathers of Revolution

Written on May 15, 2014 at 12:06 am, by

How much more must Syrians pay for their uprising against the Assad government?

Life/Work

Written on May 15, 2014 at 12:05 am, by

A conversation with keynote presenters J. Morgan Puett and Mierle Laderman Ukeles.

Crossbar

Written on May 15, 2014 at 12:04 am, by

Instead of sobering up upon seeing the beheading, I went along with the hooligans. Hell, I was one of them.

Courtyard of the Most Embarrassing God

Written on May 15, 2014 at 12:01 am, by

The pelt, dead and bristling, / might guard me from death, / a city wet with the rain of better places.

Old Wine, Broken Bottle

Written on May 1, 2014 at 12:07 am, by

Ari Shavit as harbinger of Israel’s new hard sell to American Jews.

Everyday Miracles

Written on May 1, 2014 at 12:06 am, by

The Jesuit priest, author, and avid tweeter on telling the story of Jesus through his divinity, and humanity.

Death in the Opposite House

Written on May 1, 2014 at 12:05 am, by

David Armstrong inaugurates Casa de Costa’s new East 61st Street location with an immersive mix of sculpture and photography.

Waiting for the Electricity

Written on May 1, 2014 at 12:04 am, by

In the beginning, when God was distributing the land to all the nations, we Georgians missed the meeting.

Bruno Sits on a Washing Machine

Written on May 1, 2014 at 12:01 am, by

the prairies are overrun with pioneer wives out of time / carrying rifles

The Life Sentence of Dicky Joe Jackson and His Family

Written on April 15, 2014 at 12:08 am, by

In order to pay for his son Cole’s life-saving surgery, he transported meth. But he got caught.

The Art of Independent Publishing

Written on April 15, 2014 at 12:07 am, by

The publisher of Graywolf on the pleasure of finding books others have overlooked.

A Gentleman’s War

Written on April 15, 2014 at 12:05 am, by

In the fields of Brooklyn’s Jamaica Bay, a documentarian explores the transnational landscape of the sport of cricket.

Someone Is There

Written on April 15, 2014 at 12:03 am, by

Every profession had its misfits and mediocrities, but few attracted, as his did, the very people it was designed to help.

Shipwrecked

Written on April 15, 2014 at 12:01 am, by

he was hoisted on the deck with his inheritance / of bones lowered in the berth

Building in Verse

Written on April 1, 2014 at 12:09 am, by

The inaugural poet on writing through cultural dualities, the pleasure of bilingualism, and why “the poem is a kind of mathematical proof.”

It Will Look Like a Sunset

Written on April 1, 2014 at 12:08 am, by

“You made me hit you in the face,” he said mournfully. “Now everyone is going to know.”

Shooting Film

Written on April 1, 2014 at 12:06 am, by

In Not Afraid of Film Anymore, Czech artist Tomáš Svoboda examines how we have become calm observers of modern horror.

Last Words from Montmartre

Written on April 1, 2014 at 12:04 am, by

The Taiwanese novelist's story of a passionate relationship between two young women.

I OBSERVED the acidic moisture

Written on April 1, 2014 at 12:01 am, by

the vertebrae went down and already / I saw no more than eternity and coldness

The American South: On the Map and in the Mind

Written on March 17, 2014 at 12:32 am, by

A Guernica special issue.

Beating the Drum

Written on March 17, 2014 at 12:30 am, by

The National Book Award winner on substance abuse in the rural South and being told she’d written “just a Southern book.”

Forts and Fugitives

Written on March 17, 2014 at 12:23 am, by

On the artistic transformation of a Nashville neighborhood.

Ezekiel Saw the Wheel

Written on March 17, 2014 at 12:21 am, by

A heart-fixer is he, there is nothing he does not see...

Act Two

Written on March 17, 2014 at 12:19 am, by

Only a flood could drown out / the light he still held inside.

Official Histories

Written on March 3, 2014 at 12:09 am, by

Veterans of Guatemala’s long civil war recover the secret archive of the National Police, pulling together the missing parts of the past.

Little Failures

Written on March 3, 2014 at 12:08 am, by

The satirist on drinking too much, learning to write through psychoanalysis, and making the switch to memoir.

The Offence

Written on March 3, 2014 at 12:06 am, by

An excerpt from Karolina Breguła’s short film about a Hungarian town’s fear of modernity.

The Dead at the Table

Written on March 3, 2014 at 12:05 am, by

When he left home he always needed to find a Target, otherwise he felt lost.

Northerly

Written on March 3, 2014 at 12:02 am, by

There is no word for emergency after the body / wilts.

The Useless Truth

Written on February 17, 2014 at 12:08 am, by

The National Book Award finalist on what makes a great sentence and channeling Roberto Bolaño.

The Cuckold

Written on February 17, 2014 at 12:07 am, by

Do all cuckolds start out fearless and end up foolish?

Conversion

Written on February 17, 2014 at 12:05 am, by

I do not trust these people, and they are not worth the embarrassment.

Dancing With the Machine: Studio Visit With Jonah Bokaer

Written on February 17, 2014 at 12:03 am, by

Jonah Bokaer’s immersive performances explore relationships between technology and the body.

The Moonshiner’s Prayer

Written on February 17, 2014 at 12:01 am, by

I’ll dance in the spirit with rattlers at the First Pentecostal snake church.

Freedom of Expression: The Gray Areas

Written on February 3, 2014 at 1:55 am, by

Guernica and Free Word in association with Article 19 and English PEN.

Gay Propaganda and Russia’s Shrinking Public Space

Written on February 3, 2014 at 1:51 am, by

The investigative journalist on anti-queer campaigns and the "catastrophe" of exile.

Blacked Out in Ukraine

Written on February 3, 2014 at 1:47 am, by

The artist and curator talk censorship in the arts and Ukraine's crackdown.

The Matiushin Case

Written on February 3, 2014 at 1:43 am, by

I don’t bear the army any grudge. I think they did right to beat me.

Dictation

Written on February 3, 2014 at 1:40 am, by

The man who leaves for Ye today will promptly get there yesterday

Through the Looking Glass

Written on January 15, 2014 at 12:08 am, by

A new biography of Norman Rockwell casts light on the man who hid behind his finely wrought paintings.

On the Rights and Privileges of Being an Alien

Written on January 15, 2014 at 12:07 am, by

A writer and mother learns what it means to be foreign and dark-skinned in the United States.

Richard: The Readymade Made Available

Written on January 15, 2014 at 12:06 am, by

A catalog of objects, ideas, and image, Richard revisits the readymade and its emancipatory potential.

Election

Written on January 15, 2014 at 12:04 am, by

People around Red were saying they were going to charge Piggy with a hate crime.

Kuzguncuk Hotel

Written on January 15, 2014 at 12:01 am, by

what’s life but where my memories keep shacking up

The Fake Case

Written on December 16, 2013 at 12:08 am, by

The Danish filmmaker spent four years filming Chinese artist Ai Weiwei despite heavy surveillance, and the impact the film could have on the artist’s future.

Art is a Problem

Written on December 16, 2013 at 12:06 am, by

Joshua Decter grapples with art’s inherent contradictions; the Los Angeles race riots; and a contemporary artist’s social allegories in response to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict in Art is a Problem.

The Expedition to the Baobab Tree

Written on December 16, 2013 at 12:03 am, by

I had felt him in my blood vessels, for he had come to live in me and I had begun to smell like him, and with his eyes...

Gravity

Written on December 16, 2013 at 12:01 am, by

three times the smoky war has kissed her hand / and galloped off with somebody she loved.

Portraits Of Blackness

Written on December 4, 2013 at 12:08 am, by

The general editor of the first major collection of black quotations on art and expression throughout African-American history.

South Carolina: The Border Control State

Written on December 4, 2013 at 12:07 am, by

After eighteen years in South Carolina, the first state with its own border patrol unit, a woman makes the decision to “self-deport.”

Between You and Me

Written on December 4, 2013 at 12:05 am, by

Can the art world embrace straight talk, or is it doomed to sound liked poorly translated French?

The World in the Evening

Written on December 4, 2013 at 12:04 am, by

To get to the point: last night an iceberg slid out of my mind and into the room, sheathing first the windows and then the walls with frost.

Dear Juniper,

Written on December 4, 2013 at 12:01 am, by

Just tell me it’s impossible for someone / to stop being invincible later on after starting out that way.

The Writer and the Rebellion

Written on November 15, 2013 at 12:10 am, by

“The last chapter is the most difficult to finish in a revolution, as in a novel,” writes Khaled Khalifa from war-torn Syria.

Radical Acts

Written on November 15, 2013 at 12:07 am, by

The activist, educator, and former leader of the Weather Underground on upholding revolutionary principles in “non-revolutionary times.”

Brothers in Arts

Written on November 15, 2013 at 12:06 am, by

Evading Chinese censorship, the Gao Brothers challenge authority through sculpture, painting, performance, and photography.

Pelion

Written on November 15, 2013 at 12:05 am, by

I could understand how difficult it must’ve been for two beautiful boys to resist one another, you, and my friend. But what happened next was what I had a hard time wrapping my head around.

Love Song of the Assimilated

Written on November 15, 2013 at 12:02 am, by

I’m no busboy, Bunny, I’m a yachtsman.

Guernica Films: Measure of a Life

Written on November 1, 2013 at 12:07 am, by

Face-to-face with survivors of one of the most infamous drone strikes in Pakistan.

Doing Wicked Things

Written on November 1, 2013 at 12:06 am, by

The 2013 National Book Award Finalist on magical thinking, never breaking a vow, and why she wants her poems “to have long legs.”

Edward Burtynsky’s Water

Written on November 1, 2013 at 12:05 am, by

The landscape of human impact.

Millions of Americans Are Strange

Written on November 1, 2013 at 12:03 am, by

Frank pays John to meet him at a hotel when Frank is in town so John can tie him up and leave him alone like that for eight to ten hours.

Sunrise

Written on November 1, 2013 at 12:01 am, by

The rope almost loops / in an obvious feast of beheading.

Enduring Exile

Written on October 15, 2013 at 12:07 am, by

A family’s journey from Armenia to Syria and back again.

Southern Class

Written on October 15, 2013 at 12:06 am, by

The acclaimed author on tragedy and poverty in Missouri, America's class divide, and the rejections his novel Winter’s Bone received.

Particulate Matter

Written on October 15, 2013 at 12:05 am, by

Artwork as a form of environmental criticism.

Wonder Woman Underoos

Written on October 15, 2013 at 12:04 am, by

I crawled out of the bed wearing my PJ top and these little Wonder Woman Underoos.

The Nail at Night Gradually Deepens

Written on October 15, 2013 at 12:01 am, by

nobody really owns the wild beast they raise / until they learn to cry

Heaven, Hell, and Earth

Written on October 1, 2013 at 12:07 am, by

Mental health, spiritual healers, and the hidden afterlife of war in Sierra Leone.

Telling a Whopper

Written on October 1, 2013 at 12:06 am, by

The writer-musician rewrites the Battle Hymn in his new novel, The Good Lord Bird.

Two Rivers

Written on October 1, 2013 at 12:05 am, by

The photographer’s new book defies borders and conventions in central Asia.

¡VIEQUES!

Written on October 1, 2013 at 12:04 am, by

We were Boudreaux and Rothschild, Miller and Stackowski, O’Toole and Greene. We were Dani, Alyx, Rickie, Carlita, Jaz, Sam. We were butch. We were femme. We were bois. We were a tribe.

Headstand

Written on October 1, 2013 at 12:01 am, by

my question to you is how will we hold off distress

Freedom’s Ill Fortunes

Written on September 16, 2013 at 12:06 am, by

The New Yorker journalist on the decadence of Washington, Wall Street, and Silicon Valley; institutional decay; and the widening gulf between rich and poor in America.

A Re-Imagined Palestine

Written on September 16, 2013 at 12:05 am, by

Larissa Sansour explores the Palestinian condition by using science fiction in her films and photography.

The House on Iran Street

Written on September 16, 2013 at 12:04 am, by

A map showed a tiny airplane, a jagged line trailing it, seemingly hovering over a dot named "Teheran."

Stories of Svet

Written on September 16, 2013 at 12:01 am, by

but the girl stayed dancing / underwater a wild catfish tangled in broken whiskers / until you couldn’t tell them apart

No Mercy in Motion

Written on September 3, 2013 at 12:10 am, by

Five fucking years, I thought. This is what my brother’s life is worth in Mississippi. Five years.

The Art Of Not Belonging

Written on September 3, 2013 at 12:09 am, by

The multi-award winning writer on immigration reform, returning to Haiti in her new book, and why Wikipedia is still “micro-categorizing women writers.”

Assembly

Written on September 3, 2013 at 12:06 am, by

Performance as Play: Children Pursuing Their Calling.

from A Forest of a Thousand Daemons: A Hunter’s Saga

Written on September 3, 2013 at 12:04 am, by

Without a doubt, my friend has told you the tale about my parents, and about the various things that I experienced when I visited the Forest of Irunmale.

You Knock a Third Time

Written on September 3, 2013 at 12:01 am, by

What’d’ya mean you don’t know me? / I’ve bought bibles off you before!

On Containment

Written on August 15, 2013 at 12:07 am, by

Edging on untenable.

Out of Bounds

Written on August 15, 2013 at 12:06 am, by

Censorship and freedom of speech in Sri Lanka, India, China, Burma, and England.

Bringing Up Sunny

Written on August 15, 2013 at 12:05 am, by

A champion for the bildungsroman publishes his first confessional novel based on his childhood.

Mother, Grandmother, and Aunt Ellen

Written on August 15, 2013 at 12:04 am, by

They were full of stories, and right from the beginning they wanted to tell them all, and when they did they would look at him as if to encourage him to learn them by heart

An excerpt from “A Kind of Goodbye”

Written on August 15, 2013 at 12:01 am, by

Who's coughing? It's my throat, that's all. / Really, no.—I never saw you.

Stone Wars

Written on August 1, 2013 at 12:17 am, by

In the disputed territory of Kashmir, civilians wage a battle without modern weapons against “the idea of domination.”

Ground Truthing

Written on August 1, 2013 at 12:16 am, by

The writer-activist on the qualities of silence, bearing witness to trauma, and seeking sustenance in the world’s fragile beauty.

What Remains

Written on August 1, 2013 at 12:14 am, by

In Syria, a photographer captures his subjects' pleas for normal life against the backdrop of the war-weary landscape.

Poacher

Written on August 1, 2013 at 12:13 am, by

We all waited, I think. I don’t believe anyone rose immediately. And this was because the dead man was capable of anything. If he had fallen, who knew what he might do next?

Phoenix

Written on August 1, 2013 at 12:10 am, by

He saw kind rich men walking through the dark as if through a city.

The Rights Clash

Written on July 15, 2013 at 12:09 am, by

Mining in El Salvador exposes the contradiction between human rights and corporate rights under the international investment regime.

Surfacing Impunity

Written on July 15, 2013 at 12:07 am, by

The documentary filmmaker on reenacting atrocity as an allegory for impunity in his new film, The Act of Killing, which exposes the perpetrators of Indonesia’s mid-century genocide.

Vipralambha (Union Through Separation)

Written on July 15, 2013 at 12:06 am, by

Two Dubai-based artists explore a history of political and social tension through border-crossing sounds.

Five Shards

Written on July 15, 2013 at 12:05 am, by

A couple years before I was born my mother took my four year-old brother and ran away, home to Massachusetts and her parents, where they holed up like fugitives.

Animism

Written on July 15, 2013 at 12:02 am, by

Be still in rootless snowmelt, in the shh- / there-it-is revelation of dirt

Untold Stories

Written on July 1, 2013 at 12:07 am, by

New York Times bestseller Julia Scheeres discusses racial utopias, the mass "suicide" in Jonestown in 1978, and coming of age in an abusive Christian reform school.

On the Border

Written on July 1, 2013 at 12:07 am, by

A firefighter reflects on flames, family, and migration in the deserts between Arizona and Mexico.

Mapping Marginality

Written on July 1, 2013 at 12:06 am, by

The radical geographer explores the hidden, unmapped stories of his neighborhood in Raleigh, North Carolina.

L’Amour

Written on July 1, 2013 at 12:05 am, by

The man takes a piece of paper, he writes: S. Thala. S. Thala. S. Thala.

Prairie Restoration Project

Written on July 1, 2013 at 12:03 am, by

How we blink and chew and find ourselves // cubicle-hunched, tightened under humming fluorescents

You Are The Second Person

Written on June 17, 2013 at 12:28 am, by

You wondered out loud what writing “multiculturally” actually meant and what kind of black man would write the word “bro” in an email.

Does Truth Have a Tone?

Written on June 17, 2013 at 12:23 am, by

Jamaica Kincaid on writing as transformation, “anger” versus truth, and those who think writers of color are “only entitled to write about the hardship of racism.”

Heavyweight Paint

Written on June 17, 2013 at 12:21 am, by

Four painters on the complexities of categorization via nationality, race, and subject.

Jubilee

Written on June 17, 2013 at 12:19 am, by

She’d forever be checking ethnicity boxes, emphasizing her parents’ work: farm laborer, housekeeping. Trying to prove that she was smart enough, committed enough, pleasant enough to be granted a trial period in their world.

Hydrangea Agenda

Written on June 17, 2013 at 12:16 am, by

Major, It’s been a hell of a ride

The Animal Gaze

Written on June 3, 2013 at 12:21 am, by

On reading James Salter and opening portals into unlived lives.

Waging Peace

Written on June 3, 2013 at 12:20 am, by

The West Point grad turned anti-violence advocate on the havoc of trauma, the false security of war, and training peace activists to be more like soldiers.

Bird and Stone

Written on June 3, 2013 at 12:19 am, by

Conveying an Iraqi tragedy through form, motion, and sound.

from “The Hanging Garden”

Written on June 3, 2013 at 12:18 am, by

Ma Bulpit said, “You’ll find it hard till you know the ropes. Those Lockharts… Australians mean well.”

Après Coup

Written on June 3, 2013 at 12:16 am, by

This is the vocabulary of killing.

The Faraway Nearby

Written on May 15, 2013 at 12:17 am, by

What’s your story? It’s all in the telling.

Interior Lives

Written on May 15, 2013 at 12:16 am, by

The award-winning novelist on the fluidity of sexuality, the intersections of art and selfishness, and her most recent book, The Woman Upstairs.

Radical Transgenderism

Written on May 15, 2013 at 12:14 am, by

Bronx-born, Puerto Rican photographer Elle Pérez explores queer identity in rural Tennessee.

Blak Power

Written on May 15, 2013 at 12:13 am, by

They are just everywhere, walking, rushing, running, toyi-toying, fists and machetes and knives and sticks and all sorts of weapons and the flags of the country in the air, Budapest quivering with the sound of their blazing voices: Kill the Boer, the farmer, the khiwa.

Blasphemy

Written on May 15, 2013 at 12:11 am, by

The worst thing we can think of, we’ve done

History of Omission

Written on May 1, 2013 at 2:01 am, by

The Pulitzer Prize winner on the intersection of human rights work and playwriting, telling stories that are "profoundly unheard," and why she thinks a lot of writing about Africa amounts to little more than "pornography."

Assad’s Castaways

Written on May 1, 2013 at 2:00 am, by

A portrait of Syria’s child-refugees in Antakya, Turkey.

Images from an Unfathomable Place

Written on May 1, 2013 at 12:44 am, by

The mixed-material artist on the catharsis of Korean shamanism and why “the process of purification” is her natural subject matter.

Savage Coast

Written on May 1, 2013 at 12:43 am, by

Europe, the thought of Europe swelled over the horizon, like a giant dirigible, strung with lights in a dream of suspended power, but filled, in the dream, with a gas about to burst into flame.

Wish

Written on May 1, 2013 at 12:41 am, by

Once the bone has been ground up, who, through muslin, would recognize her hand from a dog’s paw?

Breaking Down Walls

Written on April 15, 2013 at 1:16 am, by

The landscape architect on living cities, the tyranny of lawns, and how mayors will soon rule the world.

Nowhere to Turn

Written on April 15, 2013 at 1:15 am, by

There is no such thing as an environmental refugee, yet displacement as the result of climate change is growing exponentially. A personal look at the crisis in East Africa.

Trompe l’oeils

Written on April 15, 2013 at 12:09 am, by

The multiform artist creates mixed-material worlds from ceramics, drawing, and photography.

The Worst Thing That Happened

Written on April 15, 2013 at 12:08 am, by

“Don’t worry, it will be okay, these things happen for a reason,” Ma Bille said. “As I always say: the worst thing to happen to you is for the best—”

Cornerstone

Written on April 15, 2013 at 12:06 am, by

I thought I had died and that death meant repeating a name forever.

Breath of Heaven

Written on April 1, 2013 at 12:11 am, by

For Sufi saint Amadu Bamba, labor was a path to enlightenment. For his followers, work is a kind of prayer. In Senegal, Sufism comes down from the clouds.

Fifty Shades of Feminism

Written on April 1, 2013 at 12:09 am, by

The cultural historian on the rhetoric of freedom, bossy white women, and the prospects of beating patriarchy by 2040.

Studio Visit: Adrián Sonni

Written on April 1, 2013 at 12:07 am, by

The Argentine muralist on using the city as a canvas.

Psychiatrists and Mountain Dew

Written on April 1, 2013 at 12:05 am, by

I don’t want to have to get on any medicines, because as far as I’m concerned all shrinks are good for is getting you high.

Cages

Written on April 1, 2013 at 12:04 am, by

We see the night / for what it really is, a house / for our bodies

Honey Badger Duet

Written on April 1, 2013 at 12:03 am, by

Starve us, // stave off hyenas with our youth— / our muscle as protein, lion’s bait.

Guernica Movies: 5+5

Written on March 15, 2013 at 2:03 am, by

Life in a Chinese artists’ colony through the eyes of the local taxi driver

Who’s Got the Address?

Written on March 15, 2013 at 1:07 am, by

Amitava Kumar and Teju Cole collaborate on an ekphrastic project exploring how Cole’s paired images intersect with the works of artists ranging from Sontag to Singh.