Category Archives: Interviews

Negin Farsad Is Just Like All of You

Written on November 7, 2016 at 12:03 am, by

The social justice comedian on her embarrassing patriotism, bringing public policy to the stage, and making white people laugh.

When Ann Patchett Is Emperor

Written on November 3, 2016 at 12:02 am, by

The writer on America’s fear culture, bookstores as community builders, and why writers should care about their character more than their characters.

Beautiful Objects, Blighted Spaces

Written on June 15, 2016 at 12:11 am, by

The Future of Cities: The Chicago-based urban design team on rebuilding neighborhoods, gentrification, and the “magic” of Theaster Gates.

Opportunity for the Unknown

Written on June 15, 2016 at 12:09 am, by

The Future of Cities: The city planner on what Rio’s favelas can teach global cities, when communities become brands, and the value of informality.

Women, Winning

Written on June 15, 2016 at 12:07 am, by

The Future of Cities: The journalist and She Shapes the City co-founder on the women behind Nairobi’s rapidly changing identity.

This Machine Called the Camera

Written on June 1, 2016 at 12:07 am, by

The photographer of Tiananmen Square’s “Tank Man” on creating art that “gets inside you.”

A Second Start

Written on June 1, 2016 at 12:05 am, by

The Danish filmmaker discusses refugee children in Denmark, the safety of schools, and the quiet power of the observer.

Never the End

Written on May 16, 2016 at 12:08 am, by

“When you approach the second half of your life, you start to unconsciously consider what you’re passing on.”

The Gaming Guru

Written on May 16, 2016 at 12:06 am, by

The Chinese video game artist on emotion-centered play, collaboration beyond language, and the next generation of indie blockbusters.

Be the Kill-Joy

Written on May 2, 2016 at 12:09 am, by

The performance artists on the racial history of drag, jokes as a means of survival, and leaving room for paradox.

Forget You’re Watching a Play

Written on May 2, 2016 at 12:07 am, by

The director of Eclipsed on bringing the first all-female production to Broadway.

The Language of Regime

Written on April 15, 2016 at 12:09 am, by

The journalist on reporting from a post-revolutionary Iran and tracing the rich ferment of its intellectual and social history.

Upending the Archive

Written on April 15, 2016 at 12:07 am, by

The genre-bending writer on queering history and restoring lost voices to American fiction.

Beyond Objects, Beyond Scores

Written on April 1, 2016 at 12:08 am, by

The musician and composer­ on the art of self-transformation, resisting cultures of exclusion, and what he calls ‘easy camaraderie.’

The Full Texture of a City

Written on April 1, 2016 at 12:06 am, by

India's premier graphic novelist on street hustlers and the perils of cosmopolitanism.

Deep Sounds

Written on March 15, 2016 at 12:10 am, by

Future of Language: The biologist and whale expert on cetacean diversity, listening to whales, and the possibility of culture in nature.

Living in a Briefcase House

Written on March 15, 2016 at 12:08 am, by

Future of Language: The architect discusses the language of aesthetics and telling a story through a body of work.

What Makes Alaska Alaska

Written on March 15, 2016 at 12:07 am, by

Future of Language: The Native language activists discuss cultural incubation, intergenerational learning, and the role of legislation.

Dignity Through Narrative

Written on March 1, 2016 at 12:08 am, by

“Think about the last time you read a novel in which someone went to cash a benefit check or paid for food in food stamps.”

Bodies of Revolution

Written on March 1, 2016 at 12:06 am, by

Female leaders from around the globe trade notes on building a new women’s solidarity movement.

What We Owe History

Written on February 15, 2016 at 12:09 am, by

“An essay is something that tracks the evolution of the human mind.”

Making a Monstress

Written on February 15, 2016 at 12:08 am, by

The author on writing for Marvel, race and invisibility, and the radicality of romance novels.

Deadly Decisions

Written on February 15, 2016 at 12:07 am, by

The authors of The Good Death and Five Days at Memorial discuss disaster preparedness, impossible health care choices, and the notion of journalistic objectivity.

Up in Arms

Written on February 1, 2016 at 12:09 am, by

The artist and journalist on reporting from Guantánamo Bay and Syria, glamor as a subversive power, and neutrality and boredom as weapons of the state.

The Trouble With Empathy

Written on February 1, 2016 at 12:07 am, by

My complaint is against empathy as a moral guide. But as a source of pleasure, it can’t be beat.

The Face of Ferrante

Written on January 15, 2016 at 12:09 am, by

The translator discusses public secrets, private identities, and the final Neapolitan novel.

Slow Burn

Written on January 15, 2016 at 12:07 am, by

The Philippine cinema pioneer on why films are “the greatest mirror of humanity’s struggle.”

Intricate Lives

Written on January 15, 2016 at 12:06 am, by

The author on depicting female friendship and fielding questions about unlikable characters.

One Song

Written on December 15, 2015 at 12:10 am, by

Boundaries of Nations: The director on depicting the African migrant experience in Italy, moving in with his film’s lead, and the “common language” of pop music.

Seeing Cities

Written on December 15, 2015 at 12:08 am, by

Boundaries of Nations: The researchers on the politics of mapmaking, rethinking invisibility, and why dots are changing the way we look at cultural borders.

Children of War

Written on December 15, 2015 at 12:06 am, by

Boundaries of Nations: The author and activist on growing up under siege in Sarajevo and chronicling the childhood memories of other survivors.

Body Politic

Written on December 1, 2015 at 12:08 am, by

The performance artist on going solo, inhabiting dangerous spaces, and the grotesqueness of time.

The Future Perfect

Written on December 1, 2015 at 12:06 am, by

The novelist on what atheists and true believers have in common and how Mark Twain, Henry James, and “Sigmund-fucking-Freud” lack imagination.

Life as We Write It

Written on November 16, 2015 at 12:08 am, by

The author on what evolutionary science can teach us about art and literature, his enduring interest in Nabokov, and why a good joke never dies.

What If?

Written on November 16, 2015 at 12:06 am, by

The playwright and novelist on state censorship in Egypt, women in revolutions, and writing as an act of hope.

The Language of Movement

Written on November 2, 2015 at 12:08 am, by

The artist on multi-channel video work, the communicative potential of sound, and contemporizing performance traditions.

Drawing Dissent

Written on November 2, 2015 at 12:06 am, by

The political cartoonist on his new biography of Edward Snowden and living in an Orwellian age.

Moving the Needle

Written on October 15, 2015 at 12:08 am, by

The filmmaker and journalist on the future of girls’ education in Afghanistan, “white savior narratives,” and documentary as an antidote to compassion fatigue.

The Afterlife of Waste

Written on October 15, 2015 at 12:06 am, by

The Turkish artist on moving to the epicenter of throwaway culture and imagining the life-forms that “might emerge out of the contemporary ooze.”

Women in the World

Written on October 1, 2015 at 12:08 am, by

A leading researcher on the need to rescript our narratives about women and the environment.

Drawing From Life and Death

Written on October 1, 2015 at 12:06 am, by

The graphic novelist on coming of age in his comics, portraying Asian-American characters, and laying bare the anxieties of fatherhood.

Landscapes of Exclusion

Written on September 15, 2015 at 12:10 am, by

Boundaries of Nature: The cultural geographer on the misunderstood relationship between people of color and nature, and how place shapes identity.

Learning to Listen

Written on September 15, 2015 at 12:08 am, by

Boundaries of Nature: The acoustic ecologist on his fight to preserve dying soundscapes, how ambient noise affects the psyche, and recasting silence as a presence.

At Home in the Universe

Written on September 15, 2015 at 12:06 am, by

Boundaries of Nature: The scientist and writer on gender bias in the sciences and inventing new geometric forms through crochet.

Scenes From the End of the World

Written on September 1, 2015 at 12:09 am, by

The writer and photographer on their first book collaboration, the connection between Hollywood blockbusters and climate change, and how “shared terror” can make us feel less alone.

The Alchemy of Cinema

Written on September 1, 2015 at 12:07 am, by

The documentarian on white savior narratives, making enemies of gunrunners and governments, and nonfiction film as art.

In the Fictions of Our Past

Written on September 1, 2015 at 12:06 am, by

The authors discuss mourning in memoir and whether dreams belong in literature.

We Can Try to Be Human

Written on August 17, 2015 at 12:08 am, by

The Israeli author on the dramatic family histories that fuel his work and the broken promises of his homeland.

Just Out of Frame

Written on August 17, 2015 at 12:06 am, by

The journalist on the “strange, extractive” process of interviewing; second-, third-, and fourth-act stories; and coming to reporting as “a real, whole person.”

Burrow Down

Written on August 3, 2015 at 12:08 am, by

The Welsh novelist on badger baiting, human resonance in the natural world, and why he holds his breath while writing.

Waving, Not Drowning

Written on August 3, 2015 at 12:07 am, by

The New Yorker writer on the politics of surfing, reporting from war zones, and the “weird genre” of memoir.

Sisters and Spices

Written on August 3, 2015 at 12:05 am, by

The author on fiction as activism, feminism in Indian epics, and cooking to conjure a sense of home.

Players for Democracy

Written on July 15, 2015 at 12:10 am, by

The author and historian on the legacy of slavery, queer love, and the coded language of desire in the nineteenth century.

Global Kleptocracy

Written on July 15, 2015 at 12:08 am, by

The foreign policy expert on global corruption, violent extremism, and how the West “has lost the balance between rectitude and liberty.”

In Full Flight

Written on July 15, 2015 at 12:06 am, by

The writer and naturalist on the temporality of grief, inhabiting the voice of T.H. White, and developing radical empathy with a goshawk.

A Measure of Worth

Written on June 15, 2015 at 12:12 am, by

Boundaries of Taste: The folklorist and curator on self-expression through adornment in African-American communities, and fashion as a political act.

Social Fabric

Written on June 15, 2015 at 12:10 am, by

Boundaries of Taste: The Turner Prize-winning “transvestite potter” on the taste tribes of Britain.

Oenophilia

Written on June 15, 2015 at 12:08 am, by

Boundaries of Taste: The New York Times chief wine critic on the perils of connoisseurship and the pleasure in discovering one’s personal taste.

Laugh Lines

Written on June 15, 2015 at 12:06 am, by

Boundaries of Taste: The comedian on her radical education and the importance of safe spaces in the “hostile and dangerous world” of joke-making.

Why Do You Have to Change?

Written on June 1, 2015 at 12:08 am, by

The essayist on unsentimental endings, Little House On the Prairie vs. Woody Allen, and why the conversation about not having kids “needs to be reframed.”

A Safe Distance

Written on June 1, 2015 at 12:06 am, by

The writer on myth-making as a means to confront the realities of modern-day slavery.

Young, Gifted, and Black

Written on May 15, 2015 at 12:08 am, by

The author on the genius slave musician who inspired his novel and the fallacy of a post-racial America.

Playing Spaces

Written on May 15, 2015 at 12:07 am, by

The architect and writer on action as information, subtraction as growth, and indeterminacy as a practical protocol for design.

A Dangerous Language

Written on May 15, 2015 at 12:06 am, by

The Kurdish filmmaker on deploying a camera rather than a gun to fight for his community.

American Slaughterhouse

Written on May 1, 2015 at 12:09 am, by

The journalist on the myriad ills of the meat trade, the plight of migrant workers, and the twin missions of journalism and poetry.

Mythic Retreat

Written on May 1, 2015 at 12:07 am, by

The Booker Prize-winning author on samurai sword fights, the trouble with literary allusion, and the fabled world of post-Arthurian England.

Journey to the Other

Written on April 15, 2015 at 12:08 am, by

The scholar and peace activist on Palestinian centrism, living as an exile, and learning from both Fatah and Israeli soldiers on the road to radical compassion.

In Defense Of

Written on April 15, 2015 at 12:06 am, by

The “people’s lawyer” on her most controversial criminal defense cases—including the one that sent her to prison.

The Cousins Karamazov

Written on April 1, 2015 at 12:10 am, by

The acclaimed writer on reporting fiction, listening to Martin Scorsese, and the family values in his new novel, The Whites.

Blood at the Root

Written on April 1, 2015 at 12:08 am, by

The Sri Lankan-American novelist on Sri Lanka’s brutal history and grappling with the right to tell the story of the country she left behind.

Built for Humans

Written on April 1, 2015 at 12:07 am, by

The sociologist on the role of the artist in gentrification, challenges to affordable housing, and the commodification of New York City’s loft lifestyle.

Boys Don’t Cry

Written on March 16, 2015 at 12:10 am, by

Boundaries of Gender: The psychologist on the evolution of maleness and the sociocultural forces that have long stifled men and fathers.

Inflections Forever New

Written on March 16, 2015 at 12:07 am, by

Boundaries of Gender: The poet and cultural critic on the politics of motherhood and the expansive potential of the queer movement.

India’s Third Gender

Written on March 16, 2015 at 12:06 am, by

Boundaries of Gender: The activist on the ancient legacy and contemporary struggles of hijras.

Ethnographic Invention

Written on March 2, 2015 at 12:09 am, by

The novelist on the vivid life of Margaret Mead, a love triangle in the South Pacific, and the shared language of anthropology and fiction.

The Contender

Written on March 2, 2015 at 12:07 am, by

The former New York gubernatorial candidate on misperceptions of big government, the poetry of politics, and why “it would be a tragedy if [Hillary] ran in an uncontested primary.”

The Art Of Agenting

Written on March 2, 2015 at 12:06 am, by

The literary agent on gatekeeping, the truth behind big advances, and why Amazon neglects the “humanity to good books.”

Syria in its Own Image

Written on February 16, 2015 at 12:09 am, by

The documentarian and journalist on the nation’s portrayal in the global media, the power of emergency cinema, and the role of the intellectual in revolution.

Mitigating the Silence

Written on February 16, 2015 at 12:07 am, by

The author couldn’t find a single press in the world devoted to publishing African poetry. So he created one.

We Contain Multitudes

Written on February 2, 2015 at 12:08 am, by

The trans author and journalist on masculinity and male privilege, writing about the body, and crafting new narratives about gender identities.

Just to Tell the Truth

Written on February 2, 2015 at 12:06 am, by

The journalist and teacher on a century of muckrakers, the pleasures and perils of reporting, and the golden age of investigative journalism.

Inhabiting Language

Written on January 15, 2015 at 12:08 am, by

The award-winning Catalan writer on political attempts to repress his native language, inventing stories to tell the truth, and the powers and pitfalls of memory.

The Hollywood Blacklist, Revisited

Written on January 15, 2015 at 12:06 am, by

The filmmaker and scholar on the radical legacy of American Communist film.

God’s Creation Is Running a Fever

Written on December 15, 2014 at 12:10 am, by

Religion in America: The climate scientist on denialism and why her evangelical faith demands action.

Whole Self Movement

Written on December 15, 2014 at 12:08 am, by

Religion in America: The transgender rabbi on religious rituals, gender fluidity, and the language of LGBTQ inclusion.

What We Are Now, You Shall Be

Written on December 15, 2014 at 12:06 am, by

Religion in America: The Hare Krishna monk on cultural stereotypes, teaching faith through food, and America’s obsession with yoga.

The Only Choices You Have

Written on December 1, 2014 at 12:08 am, by

The longtime contributor to The New York Review of Books on the history of racial justice from World War I to Ferguson.

The Everyday Extraordinary

Written on December 1, 2014 at 12:06 am, by

The poet and curator on expanding autobiography, the importance of elegy, and the centrality of blues to experience.

Blackness as the Second Person

Written on November 17, 2014 at 12:09 am, by

The National Book Award finalist on chronicling everyday racism, the violence inherent in language, and the continuum from Rodney King to Michael Brown.

Humane Endeavor

Written on November 17, 2014 at 12:07 am, by

The surgeon and public health journalist on the gaps in healthcare policy, the sharp elbows of politics, and dignity in end-of-life care.

Salvaged Crossings

Written on November 17, 2014 at 12:06 am, by

Unearthing the stories of “coolie women”—early-twentieth-century indentured laborers shipped from India to work on sugar plantations across the colonial world.

Violently Wrought

Written on November 3, 2014 at 12:08 am, by

The author of A Brief History of Seven Killings on Bob Marley, writing terror explicitly, and why sloppiness serves good storytelling.

Verses of Love and War

Written on November 3, 2014 at 12:06 am, by

The writer on the faces of violence in conflict zones, and why poetry offers a form of liberation that journalism cannot.

The Arc of Possibility

Written on October 15, 2014 at 12:08 am, by

The longtime Beijing correspondent on the roots of dissent in Hong Kong, China’s “Me” generation, and the precarious expansion of Chinese civil society.

We Wear the Mask

Written on October 15, 2014 at 12:06 am, by

The writer on coming of age in dichotomous Baltimore and being warned against writing about race.

Hippocratic Bloat

Written on October 1, 2014 at 12:10 am, by

American Empires: A journalist and a cardiologist discuss healthcare gone haywire and how Americans are medicating themselves to death.

Divine Acquisition

Written on October 1, 2014 at 12:08 am, by

American Empires: The scholar of African-American religion on black megachurches and the marketability of the American Dream.

Pull Back to Reveal

Written on October 1, 2014 at 12:06 am, by

American Empires: The privacy advocate and legal advisor to Edward Snowden on today’s surveillance empire.

Back to School

Written on September 15, 2014 at 12:09 am, by

The former assistant secretary of education grapples with the school-reform movement and the systemic issues that plague American education.

How Does It End?

Written on September 15, 2014 at 12:06 am, by

The debut novelist and former Jehovah’s Witness on being a child preacher, leaving the church, and the safety of a good book.

A Tripartite Drama

Written on September 2, 2014 at 12:10 am, by

The Pulitzer Prize-winning writer mines the ongoing resonance of the Camp David Accords, on stage and on the page.

Fiery Appetites

Written on September 2, 2014 at 12:08 am, by

The novelist and reproductive rights advocate on motherhood, sex, and the sensuality of restaurant life.

Grays in the Emerald City

Written on August 15, 2014 at 12:08 am, by

As Iraq faces a new crisis, the novel Baghdad Central explores the freighted “moment of ambiguity” a decade earlier.

Night Vision

Written on August 15, 2014 at 12:06 am, by

The acclaimed novelist on the secrets, dreams, and myths that fuel her storytelling.

Documenting Proximity

Written on August 15, 2014 at 12:05 am, by

A mathematician destined for a plum job in finance drops everything to become a freelance journalist in war-torn Congo.

Felt Not Known

Written on August 1, 2014 at 12:08 am, by

The novelist on mythic creatures, horror stories, and sensory maladies.

Lyrical Impulse

Written on August 1, 2014 at 12:06 am, by

The author on crafting new sounds, creating female characters, and portraying sex in literature.

How Do You Know?

Written on July 15, 2014 at 12:10 am, by

The Bangladeshi-British writer on news versus novels, swapping rural poverty for Wall Street, and “the power of story on the human mind.”

To Zion and Back

Written on July 15, 2014 at 12:07 am, by

The journalist on the rise of Israeli extremism.

Combing the Edges

Written on July 15, 2014 at 12:06 am, by

The editorial director of Other Press on cultivating politically important literature, seeking new voices, and race and class in publishing.

Servings of Small Change

Written on June 16, 2014 at 12:10 am, by

The food writers on building a food movement that transcends class lines.

Going Through Customs

Written on June 16, 2014 at 12:08 am, by

The Chicana filmmaker on documenting a debutante ball in honor of George Washington’s birthday in Laredo, Texas, and adopting the Mexican-American border as her "muse.”

Talking Clean and Acting Dirty

Written on June 16, 2014 at 12:06 am, by

The “father of environmental justice” on the politics of protection and vulnerability.

Notes for the Stage

Written on June 2, 2014 at 12:08 am, by

The Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright on his relationship to Jewish artists, “the simple sense of being human,” and experiencing his work for the first time along with its audience.

This Little Light of Ours

Written on June 2, 2014 at 12:06 am, by

The Freedom Summer director on Mississippi and the role of music in civil rights.

Myth Is a Theorem About the Nature of Reality

Written on May 15, 2014 at 12:09 am, by

The scholar on the vivid tradition of Haida poetry.

The Thirty-Year Plan

Written on May 15, 2014 at 12:07 am, by

The sociologist on turning the focus of the reproductive rights movement from abortion to love, sex, family, and community.

A Nightmare of Violence and Terror

Written on May 1, 2014 at 12:08 am, by

The PEN Prize-winning writer on his four-year journey as an undocumented immigrant, the “prison” of literary Arabic, and imagining a new Iraq.

Everyday Miracles

Written on May 1, 2014 at 12:06 am, by

The Jesuit priest, author, and avid tweeter on telling the story of Jesus through his divinity, and humanity.

The Third Maria

Written on April 15, 2014 at 12:09 am, by

The former member of the “Three Marias” on feminism forty years after the Portuguese Revolution, Facebook, and insubordination.

The Art of Independent Publishing

Written on April 15, 2014 at 12:07 am, by

The publisher of Graywolf on the pleasure of finding books others have overlooked.

A Muscle of Belief

Written on April 15, 2014 at 12:06 am, by

The Guggenheim fellow on returning to free verse in her latest collection, the difficulty of being joyful, and why poetry has taken the place of religion in her life.

Building in Verse

Written on April 1, 2014 at 12:09 am, by

The inaugural poet on writing through cultural dualities, the pleasure of bilingualism, and why “the poem is a kind of mathematical proof.”

Stasis Shift

Written on April 1, 2014 at 12:07 am, by

The Jadaliyya co-founder on telling alternative stories about the Arab world, understanding the life cycles of revolution, and confronting “the weight of ancient problems.”

Beating the Drum

Written on March 17, 2014 at 12:30 am, by

The National Book Award winner on substance abuse in the rural South and being told she’d written “just a Southern book.”

Sound Medicine

Written on March 17, 2014 at 12:28 am, by

The “moonshine roots” musician on the magnetism of Southern music, learning to sing in church, and the timbre of the Tennessee landscape.

Salt of the Earth

Written on March 17, 2014 at 12:26 am, by

The Southern food historian on the politics of consumption, matzoh ball gumbo, and the multicultural “terroir” of the South.

Walking With the Wind

Written on March 17, 2014 at 12:24 am, by

The Alabama-based lawyer on who we talk about when we talk about the Old South and how his project to locate and mark the sites of slave markets speaks the language of Southern history.

This Is Also My World

Written on March 3, 2014 at 12:10 am, by

The Lebanese-American author on the dangers of writing what you know, the constant fear that he’s destroying his career, and why he believes that much of contemporary U.S. fiction is “not adventurous enough.”

Little Failures

Written on March 3, 2014 at 12:08 am, by

The satirist on drinking too much, learning to write through psychoanalysis, and making the switch to memoir.

Running to the River

Written on March 3, 2014 at 12:07 am, by

The Caine Prize-winning writer on resurrecting history’s ghosts, finding stories amid political violence, and why “Kenya is a mercurial character.”

The Useless Truth

Written on February 17, 2014 at 12:08 am, by

The National Book Award finalist on what makes a great sentence and channeling Roberto Bolaño.

By the Sea

Written on February 17, 2014 at 12:06 am, by

The filmmaker on finding inspiration in poetry and the meaning of “home” in Palestine.

Gay Propaganda and Russia’s Shrinking Public Space

Written on February 3, 2014 at 1:51 am, by

The investigative journalist on anti-queer campaigns and the "catastrophe" of exile.

Where’s The Rage?

Written on February 3, 2014 at 1:50 am, by

Kamila Shamsie and Pankaj Mishra discuss the absence of political anger in Western literature and why we shouldn’t be so quick to condemn writers like Mo Yan.

Justice in China

Written on February 3, 2014 at 1:45 am, by

Emily Parker talks with Yiyun Li about self-censorship in China, the line between fact and fiction, and whether it’s possible to create good art under a repressive regime.

A Gap in Definitions

Written on January 15, 2014 at 12:10 am, by

The award-winning Northern Irish writer on life in New York, poetry as “a way of being alone without feeling alone," and why “all writing is political.”

Through the Looking Glass

Written on January 15, 2014 at 12:08 am, by

A new biography of Norman Rockwell casts light on the man who hid behind his finely wrought paintings.

From Left Field

Written on December 16, 2013 at 12:10 am, by

The controversial author unravels the complexity of the Israel-Palestine conflict and the “inevitable tragedy” at the heart of Zionism.

The Fake Case

Written on December 16, 2013 at 12:08 am, by

The Danish filmmaker spent four years filming Chinese artist Ai Weiwei despite heavy surveillance, and the impact the film could have on the artist’s future.

Paint and Die Happy

Written on December 16, 2013 at 12:07 am, by

The American painter on the terror of a blank canvas, finding inspiration in the streets of New York, and how motherhood has impacted her art.

The Science of Sex

Written on December 4, 2013 at 12:09 am, by

The journalist on researching lust, the myth of female monogamy, and why “voyeurism is essential to good writing.”

Portraits Of Blackness

Written on December 4, 2013 at 12:08 am, by

The general editor of the first major collection of black quotations on art and expression throughout African-American history.

Experiments in Change

Written on December 4, 2013 at 12:06 am, by

The longtime climate change activist talks about online organizing in the Global South and the incremental nature of political change.

The Dark Fantastic

Written on November 15, 2013 at 12:08 am, by

The writer and translator on the U.S. healthcare system, her guilt over creating characters from real life, and why she’s “not a good political militant.”

Radical Acts

Written on November 15, 2013 at 12:07 am, by

The activist, educator, and former leader of the Weather Underground on upholding revolutionary principles in “non-revolutionary times.”

Dead Language

Written on November 1, 2013 at 12:09 am, by

The acclaimed & Sons author on the importance of entertainment, his slip into obsessive-compulsive behavior, and why he believes Salinger chose seclusion.

Doing Wicked Things

Written on November 1, 2013 at 12:06 am, by

The 2013 National Book Award Finalist on magical thinking, never breaking a vow, and why she wants her poems “to have long legs.”

The Afterwar

Written on October 15, 2013 at 12:08 am, by

The Pulitzer Prize winner discusses PTSD, returning home from the front lines, and America's "haphazard system" of veteran care.

Southern Class

Written on October 15, 2013 at 12:06 am, by

The acclaimed author on tragedy and poverty in Missouri, America's class divide, and the rejections his novel Winter’s Bone received.

The Pendulum

Written on October 1, 2013 at 12:08 am, by

The prolific novelist on historical fiction, overthrowing oppression and her two most recent works, Daddy Love and The Accursed.

Telling a Whopper

Written on October 1, 2013 at 12:06 am, by

The writer-musician rewrites the Battle Hymn in his new novel, The Good Lord Bird.

Talking to Ireland

Written on September 16, 2013 at 12:09 am, by

The multi-prize-winning author talks about dissecting 1970s Britain in her new book, the “loathsome” idea that motherhood is incompatible with writing, and why stutterers make good novelists.

Freedom’s Ill Fortunes

Written on September 16, 2013 at 12:06 am, by

The New Yorker journalist on the decadence of Washington, Wall Street, and Silicon Valley; institutional decay; and the widening gulf between rich and poor in America.

The Art Of Not Belonging

Written on September 3, 2013 at 12:09 am, by

The multi-award winning writer on immigration reform, returning to Haiti in her new book, and why Wikipedia is still “micro-categorizing women writers.”

Bare-Knuckle Writing

Written on September 3, 2013 at 12:07 am, by

The acclaimed novelist & art critic on dismantling notions of gendered writing, the pleasures of translated texts, and “the clear divide between art and politics” in contemporary American fiction.

Mystery Is All There Is

Written on August 15, 2013 at 12:09 am, by

The prize-winning novelist on learning English by copying out Moby Dick, politics in Afghanistan and Pakistan, and his compulsion to write from a terrorist’s perspective.

Out of Bounds

Written on August 15, 2013 at 12:06 am, by

Censorship and freedom of speech in Sri Lanka, India, China, Burma, and England.

Rebuilding Libya

Written on August 1, 2013 at 12:18 am, by

The formerly blacklisted writer talks about censorship under the Gadhafi regime, seeking asylum in Ireland, and why culture in Tripoli is now “as important as food and water.”

Ground Truthing

Written on August 1, 2013 at 12:16 am, by

The writer-activist on the qualities of silence, bearing witness to trauma, and seeking sustenance in the world’s fragile beauty.

How to Make a Life

Written on July 15, 2013 at 12:12 am, by

The acclaimed novelist and short story writer talks about sensual sentences, the controversy surrounding his first novel, and why his “enemy is blasé, detached, ironic art of any kind.”

It’s All in Your Head

Written on July 15, 2013 at 12:11 am, by

People come to think of their unhappiness as a disease, rather than the result of a traumatic world.

Surfacing Impunity

Written on July 15, 2013 at 12:07 am, by

The documentary filmmaker on reenacting atrocity as an allegory for impunity in his new film, The Act of Killing, which exposes the perpetrators of Indonesia’s mid-century genocide.

Literary Culture Clash

Written on July 1, 2013 at 12:09 am, by

The “super-agent” talks about finding success with messy, difficult books, re-thinking how we publish works in translation, and the advice she gives to authors---no hotel porn on book tours.

Untold Stories

Written on July 1, 2013 at 12:07 am, by

New York Times bestseller Julia Scheeres discusses racial utopias, the mass "suicide" in Jonestown in 1978, and coming of age in an abusive Christian reform school.

Beyond the Binary Behind Bars

Written on June 17, 2013 at 12:24 am, by

The activist academic on the prison industrial military complex and its impact on women of color.

Does Truth Have a Tone?

Written on June 17, 2013 at 12:23 am, by

Jamaica Kincaid on writing as transformation, “anger” versus truth, and those who think writers of color are “only entitled to write about the hardship of racism.”

A Long Time to Change

Written on June 17, 2013 at 12:22 am, by

The former Black Panther on coming of age in the party, ongoing police brutality, and her recent memoir turned novel, Virgin Soul.

Better Off Said

Written on June 3, 2013 at 12:25 am, by

Four writers on the gendered world of confessional writing, telling the truth about loved ones, and the line between bravery and betrayal.

Redeemed

Written on June 3, 2013 at 12:22 am, by

The bestselling author of Wild on the Pacific Crest Trail, bringing consciousness to bear on the work, and how success has been met with a backlash.

Waging Peace

Written on June 3, 2013 at 12:20 am, by

The West Point grad turned anti-violence advocate on the havoc of trauma, the false security of war, and training peace activists to be more like soldiers.

A Question of Faith

Written on May 15, 2013 at 12:20 am, by

The debut novelist on the Great Migration and nation-building, conflations of race and class, and her “belief in belief."

Interior Lives

Written on May 15, 2013 at 12:16 am, by

The award-winning novelist on the fluidity of sexuality, the intersections of art and selfishness, and her most recent book, The Woman Upstairs.

Another Kind of Life

Written on May 1, 2013 at 2:03 am, by

The American writer discusses turning his back on showy prose, being labelled an “erotic” author, and “the importance of being somebody.”

History of Omission

Written on May 1, 2013 at 2:01 am, by

The Pulitzer Prize winner on the intersection of human rights work and playwriting, telling stories that are "profoundly unheard," and why she thinks a lot of writing about Africa amounts to little more than "pornography."

Origin Stories

Written on April 15, 2013 at 1:18 am, by

The Guatemalan writer on his grandfather's escape from Auschwitz, translation as collaboration, and giving readers "the words they deserve.

Breaking Down Walls

Written on April 15, 2013 at 1:16 am, by

The landscape architect on living cities, the tyranny of lawns, and how mayors will soon rule the world.

Waiting for Nasreen

Written on April 1, 2013 at 12:12 am, by

Two writers discuss their cyber-stalker.

Fifty Shades of Feminism

Written on April 1, 2013 at 12:09 am, by

The cultural historian on the rhetoric of freedom, bossy white women, and the prospects of beating patriarchy by 2040.

Losing the Plot

Written on April 1, 2013 at 12:08 am, by

The Booker Prize nominated novelist talks about his obsession with Pynchon, history as interference, & why literary fiction needn’t forsake the pleasures of suspense.

American Utopia

Written on March 15, 2013 at 1:08 am, by

The bestselling novelist talks about the art of optimism, gender bias in the literary world, and donning public personas.

There Is No Real Life

Written on March 15, 2013 at 12:11 am, by

The MacArthur "Genius" on willful delusions, the ego’s limit, and the stories we tell to make sense of experience.

Pitch Forward

Written on March 15, 2013 at 12:10 am, by

The writer, art historian, and street photographer on the body vs. the intellect, the mythical pre-history of humanity, and how very serious a Twitter post can be.

Re-imagining Dissent

Written on March 1, 2013 at 12:09 am, by

The Nation columnist and law professor on dissent, privatization, and the future of racial equity.

Imperfect Tools

Written on March 1, 2013 at 12:08 am, by

Sarah Manguso on memory, mental illness and how writing “is like feeding the cassette tape through the machine one last time after it breaks”

Hard Wired

Written on March 1, 2013 at 12:07 am, by

On the evolution of Internet bullying, resilience of underdogs, and the promise of today’s teens.

Waging War On Sex Workers

Written on February 15, 2013 at 12:11 am, by

The journalist and former sex worker on what feminists get wrong about prostitution.

Carnal Knowledge

Written on February 15, 2013 at 12:09 am, by

Melissa Febos on her dominatrix memoir, teaching sexuality in literature, and what it takes to make a great sex scene.

Amis Unfiltered

Written on February 1, 2013 at 12:09 am, by

The provocateur on Obama’s second term and the role of bad behavior in fiction.

Roe v. Wade at Forty: Beyond Pro-Choice

Written on February 1, 2013 at 12:07 am, by

Her name tag said 'Lynn Paltrow: Reproductive Justice.' Pulling out a sharpie, she added, 'And Drugs.'

The Prophet’s Path

Written on February 1, 2013 at 12:06 am, by

The journalist and "accidental theologist" discusses distinguishing human from legend in her latest book on the founder of Islam.

The Caregivers Coalition

Written on January 15, 2013 at 12:12 am, by

One of TIME and Newsweek’s most influential people of 2012, Ai-jen Poo works to address a swiftly aging population, and an exploited workforce, by reforming domestic labor standards.

Heart of the Dataset

Written on January 15, 2013 at 12:09 am, by

The data journalist and designer on the balance between content and beauty

No Escape

Written on December 17, 2012 at 12:11 am, by

The PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize winner on her debut dystopian novel and the role of American fiction in the face of escalating violence.

Water Warm as Soup, Water Cold to the Teeth

Written on December 17, 2012 at 12:10 am, by

After a decade of absence, the Mexican-American author and activist returns to the literary scene to discuss her new book, what it takes to 'compost' grief into light, and the long road for writers of color.

Pocket Poets

Written on December 17, 2012 at 12:07 am, by

The professor and critic turns to technology explosions past—think typewriters, gramophones, and radios—to map the modern intersections of information and art.

Close to the Bone

Written on December 3, 2012 at 12:11 am, by

The 5-Under-35 author on growing up in the Mojave, busting up the lines between fiction and nonfiction, and braving her way into the dark heart of the West’s discarded stories.

Due Process, Imminent Threat

Written on December 3, 2012 at 12:09 am, by

From electronic surveillance to drone strikes to racial disparities in the criminal justice system, the writer, lawyer, and advocate anticipates the most pressing issues of the next four years.

Secrecy and Sexual Assault in the Military

Written on November 15, 2012 at 12:10 am, by

After spurring an investigation of internal violence in the armed forces, the journalist explores the same themes through fiction.

Out of the Darkness

Written on November 15, 2012 at 12:08 am, by

A.M. Homes on Nixon’s psyche, American dementia, and writing like a man.

A Rioter’s Prayer

Written on November 1, 2012 at 12:11 am, by

Pussy Riot's Yekaterina Samutsevich on protest, art, and freedom

Growing the Hell Up: From Middle Earth to NJ

Written on November 1, 2012 at 12:10 am, by

The MacArthur “Genius” on his forthcoming sci-fi epic, Monstro, and the evolution of his wily main character, Yunior.

High Art, Low Blues

Written on October 15, 2012 at 12:12 am, by

Led Zeppelin guitarist Jimmy Page and former White Stripe Jack White on what’s killing the humanity of performances, how the wrong teacher can “really mess you up,” and the power of the blues.

Living Novelistically

Written on October 15, 2012 at 12:11 am, by

The famed writer on life as Joseph Anton, the problems of free speech, and the importance of telling the ‘goddamn truth’.

The Future of Carbon Trading in Chiapas

Written on October 15, 2012 at 12:09 am, by

Climate change activism collides with indigenous land movements in Mexico’s Zapatista heartland, where the interests of a green economy threaten to crowd out the voices of those for whom it matters.

Cunning and Guile

Written on October 1, 2012 at 12:13 am, by

What can The One Thousand and One Nights teach the modern world?

Stealing Liberties

Written on September 17, 2012 at 12:28 am, by

Pulitzer Prize winner David Shipler on why bad guys deserve rights, how small-town officials wield big-time power, and why Obama has been bad for the Constitution.

Gender Gap

Written on September 17, 2012 at 12:25 am, by

Hanna Rosin’s controversial new book proclaims the "end of men." But what about the women?

Women in Power and Politics

Written on September 4, 2012 at 12:11 am, by

Sonia Gandhi and Aung San Suu Kyi have overcome tragic and arduous pasts to emerge as leaders of India and Burma. What’s next for these two historical icons?

Designed for Death

Written on September 4, 2012 at 12:10 am, by

As we grapple with the legal, political, and cultural implications of drone warfare and targeted killing, the renowned anthropologist draws on an older turning point in military ethics—weapons design at Los Alamos.

Reporting Poverty

Written on September 4, 2012 at 12:09 am, by

Following three years of research in an Indian slum, the Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist discusses what language can’t express, her view that nobody is representative, and the ethical dilemmas of writing about the poor.

Life After Karadzic

Written on August 15, 2012 at 12:09 am, by

A Bosnian genocide survivor and a human rights journalist confront terror, loss, and what it takes to heal.

The End of Gore Vidal

Written on August 15, 2012 at 12:08 am, by

The iconoclastic leftist and novelist discusses the rage that fueled him, and how he felt about his coming end alongside the ruin of America.

Notes from the Underground

Written on August 1, 2012 at 2:00 am, by

Writer and former radical bookstore owner Sean Stewart talks about his new book on the underground press that was so vital to '60s counterculture.

On the Fly: Reassessing the Forgotten Icon, Richard Brautigan

Written on August 1, 2012 at 12:24 am, by

An exhaustive new biography of Brautigan will change the way we remember the poet and novelist.

Street Art and the New Bohemian: A conversation with Eric Drooker and Molly Crabapple

Written on July 16, 2012 at 12:06 am, by

The two visual artists on the gravitas needed to make protest art, the rhetoric and representations of the Occupy movement, and how to seduce an audience by grabbing them by the eyeballs.

Precarious Ground

Written on July 16, 2012 at 12:05 am, by

Documentarian Annie Eastman tells the stories of families in Salvador’s palafitas—water slums built on piles of garbage—and confronts her outsider status.

On the Fly: The Vatican’s Cult of Perverts

Written on July 2, 2012 at 12:06 am, by

In its bank crisis as well as its sex abuse scandals, the Catholic Church is defined by an astonishing lack of accountability. Is this why a parish per week closes in the United States?

Water by the Spoonful: An interview with Quiara Alegría Hudes

Written on July 2, 2012 at 12:02 am, by

In the afterglow of her Pulitzer win, the feminist playwright opens up about border-crossing, why she’d make a terrible critic, and her master teacher, Paula Vogel.

Carlos Fuentes: The Lost Interview

Written on June 15, 2012 at 12:02 am, by

A conversation recorded on the road reveals the late author’s take on the role of the writer-as-activist. Read and listen.

Writing What Haunts Us

Written on June 15, 2012 at 12:02 am, by

Anthony Swofford on bad habits, good writing, and coming back from the brink

Against the Line

Written on June 1, 2012 at 7:30 pm, by

The literary legend on his new book of poetry, about a personal evolution, and those he's published; MFA's and prizes; and the ongoing river of language.

What’s Going to Last

Written on June 1, 2012 at 12:00 am, by

The Bolivian writer Juan Claudio Lechín on the conditions that predicate fascism and the morality of anarchism.

Photography and Other Truths

Written on May 15, 2012 at 10:00 pm, by

South Africa's Pieter Hugo on negotiating representations of Africa, the searing controversy surrounding his work, Nick Cave, and his friend the late Tim Hetherington.

Market Anonymous

Written on May 15, 2012 at 12:00 am, by

Author Misha Glenny discusses the escalating danger of cyber-crime, its impact on civil liberties, and why hackers should be nurtured for their creativity and skills.

What Money Can’t Buy

Written on May 1, 2012 at 12:06 am, by

Michael Sandel on a society where everything could be up for sale.

Beholden

Written on May 1, 2012 at 12:00 am, by

Rebecca Solnit and David Graeber on anarchism as a problem-solving tool, the return of debtors' prisons, and why communism is ingrained in capitalism

Interpreting Shari’a

Written on May 1, 2012 at 12:00 am, by

Sadakat Kadri on Muslim and Western ignorance of what Shari'a law really means--and the real concerns that should be targeted.

Not Quite Invisible

Written on April 15, 2012 at 4:00 pm, by

Pultizer Prize-winner Mark Strand on falling in love, leaving the U.S., and the next chapter.

One to Nothing

Written on April 15, 2012 at 8:00 am, by

Irina Rozovsky contends with questions of how land, identity, and conflict can be identified into two-dimensional form.

Writing Images

Written on April 15, 2012 at 8:00 am, by

From a new collection of playwright interviews, Pulitzer Prize winner Nilo Cruz on Lorca, American directors, and the cross he won’t bear.

Never Enough

Written on April 1, 2012 at 12:26 am, by

The great eater, writer, and humorist Calvin Trillin remembers when journalism wasn't so respectable.

Capturing Tripoli

Written on March 23, 2012 at 11:48 pm, by

One year after the UN approval of a no-fly zone over Libya, Award-winning photojournalist and war correspondent Medyan Dairieh discusses life on the frontline.

Ondaatje’s Table

Written on March 23, 2012 at 11:15 pm, by

Michael Ondaatje on making fiction of un-remembered autobiography, holding back two-thirds of the story, and bringing the marginalized to the center

Cinefilia en Habana

Written on March 1, 2012 at 1:03 pm, by

How one Cuban filmmaker bucks the revolution and reimagines Utopia.

The Dyer’s Hand

Written on February 24, 2012 at 4:43 pm, by

Genre-defying British writer Geoff Dyer on how watching Tarkovsky’s Stalker on repeat turned into his most successful book.

The Literature of Conflicted Lands

Written on February 15, 2012 at 9:44 pm, by

Novelists Mirza Waheed, Roma Tearne, and Daisy Hasan on how novels help us understand the strife-filled regions of Asia.

Gang, Interrupted

Written on February 1, 2012 at 10:15 pm, by

Hoop Dreams director Steve James’s new film follows former gang members who neutralize Chicago gang violence

White on Noir

Written on February 1, 2012 at 1:08 pm, by

The artist Eve Sussman dissects infrastructure as beauty, Soviet-era aesthetics, Occupy Wall Street, Williamsburg lofts, and her latest film that uses an algorithm to distinguish each screening. With a sample selection.

Waiting for Nobody

Written on January 15, 2012 at 6:17 pm, by

The controversial education reformer on improving mobility, the gap between the U.S. and other developed countries, and why she’s optimistic.

OK, Computer

Written on January 15, 2012 at 1:10 am, by

The former Gates Foundation director thinks technology will help ready American students for college and careers. But they (and their parents) ought to work twice as hard as they do.

Life and Death in Karachi

Written on January 1, 2012 at 11:59 pm, by

The NPR host and reporter on what Americans miss when they consider Karachi, the city's resilience, and what Jinnah really envisioned in Pakistan.

The Female Grotesque

Written on January 1, 2012 at 10:33 pm, by

South Korean poet Kim Hyesoon on subverting expectations, her use of grotesque language, and the state of feminism in Korea.

For Sale: Baby

Written on December 15, 2011 at 11:08 pm, by

The investigative journalist on the search for Maria Fernanda, the role of Christianity in the trafficking of Guatemalan adoptees, and funding the research for her book via Kickstarter.

Studio Visit: Wardell Milan

Written on December 15, 2011 at 6:08 pm, by

Artist Wardell Milan on dioramas, Matchbox villages and riffing on Ralph Ellison.

The Harmonizer

Written on December 15, 2011 at 4:47 pm, by

The Emmy Award–winning poet and crisis reporter on Haiti’s continuing struggles and Jamaica’s AIDS crisis, how Afro-Caribbean music has influenced the writing of V.S. Naipaul and Langston Hughes, and his new role as editor of Prairie Schooner.

The Wizard of #OWS

Written on December 1, 2011 at 11:34 pm, by

The editor in chief of Adbusters on sparking the Occupy Wall Street movement and its next phase, why the president is a “f#$%ing wimp,” and his beef with David Brooks.

Picturing Africa

Written on December 1, 2011 at 4:33 pm, by

Lagos Photo Festival founder Azu Nwagbogu on combating Afro-pessimism, the dialogue between Africa and the West, and depicting the “other Africa” of industry and intellect.

Unsettled

Written on November 15, 2011 at 11:59 pm, by

Israeli journalist Amira Hass on the next Palestinian uprising and her attempts to cut through propaganda to get at the truths of the lives next door.

Miracle Realist

Written on November 15, 2011 at 11:39 pm, by

In a candid interview, the Israeli author on Netanyahu’s impotence, how his son’s death affected his latest novel, and Israel’s need to embrace Palestinians with humanity.

Myth About Myths

Written on November 1, 2011 at 8:11 pm, by

The Iranian writer on the tension between artists and intellectuals, the power of mysticism, and the long-lasting effects of the 1979 revolution.

Postcards from Karachi

Written on October 15, 2011 at 11:59 pm, by

Poet and war correspondent Eliza Griswold reports from Pakistan on the killing of Osama bin Laden.

On the Fly with Katherine Ellison

Written on October 15, 2011 at 11:59 pm, by

The Pulitzer Prize–winning investigative reporter on receiving an ADHD diagnosis at the same time as her son, how writing her new memoir helped them deal with their mutual diagnosis, and the mental health industry.

Libya’s Reluctant Spokesman

Written on October 15, 2011 at 8:59 pm, by

On the occasion of his second novel, Libyan author Hisham Matar discusses the effect of totalitarianism on personal lives, what makes the novel a great art form, and the Arab Spring.

The Lioness of Iran

Written on October 1, 2011 at 11:55 pm, by

Iran’s most prominent poet, a two-time Nobel nominee, on the greatest epic in history, the nightmare of censorship, and why her country will eventually achieve democracy.

Studio Visit: Legacy Russell

Written on October 1, 2011 at 11:19 am, by

In the debut of Guernica’s new interview series, Madeleine Hunt-Ehrlich visits the studio of Legacy Russell and gets the lowdown on Russell’s ongoing performance project Open Ceremony.

The Weight of the Poor

Written on September 15, 2011 at 12:31 am, by

The professor Glenn Beck loves to hate speaks with Cornel West about waitressing, black nationalism, how the radical right helped her define her politics, and why she’s gloomy about America’s future.

Fundamentals

Written on September 15, 2011 at 12:00 am, by

The author of the lauded graphic novel Blankets discusses the influences behind his new book, the effect of 9/11 on his work, and the decline of the superhero in comics.

Remains of the Day

Written on September 1, 2011 at 11:59 pm, by

A New York City mother and Port Authority executive recalls the worst day of her life and the aftermath for herself, her colleagues, and her family. From a new oral history of September 11.

Parts and Partial

Written on September 1, 2011 at 9:00 pm, by

You thought feminists had to focus on empowering women? Stephanie Coontz on why, after a sustained assault on families and unions, that just isn't enough anymore.

Democracies of Bread

Written on August 15, 2011 at 12:00 am, by

The author of Day of Honey discusses ancient Iraqi cooking, the Middle East’s dependence on imported wheat, and the link between bread and civilian uprisings.

On the Fly: Belva Davis

Written on August 15, 2011 at 12:00 am, by

Broadcast journalist Belva Davis on her family’s move from Louisiana to Oakland, California, her new memoir, and becoming the first female African American television reporter on the West Coast.

The Switchboard

Written on August 1, 2011 at 12:00 am, by

The wry poet on the crossover between poetry and the punk rock scene, O’Hara and Ginsberg, and embracing technology.

Social Business

Written on August 1, 2011 at 12:00 am, by

Was Nobel Peace Laureate Muhammad Yunus’s sacking from the microlending bank he created part of a conspiracy to discredit and force him out?

Pacific

Written on July 15, 2011 at 8:49 pm, by

A meditation on an artist coming into her own and out into the open.

Recovering Cubanness

Written on July 15, 2011 at 1:22 pm, by

The Pulitzer Prize-winning author on his new memoir, recovering his Latin roots in America, his relationship with Donald Barthelme, and how he found his voice.

The Sick and the Well

Written on July 1, 2011 at 12:00 am, by

Lynne Tillman discusses her latest mindfuck story collection and how social reading platforms erode the barrier between writer and reader.

Contested Territory

Written on July 1, 2011 at 12:00 am, by

On July 9, southern Sudan is scheduled to become the world’s newest country. Rebecca Hamilton discusses the impact of this change on the rest of the region.

Never the Face

Written on June 15, 2011 at 1:00 am, by

Claire Messud and novelist Ariel Sands (the alias for an internationally known nonfiction writer) discuss S&M in literature, the glorification of obsessive love, and whether there's a feminist defense of submissiveness.

Off the Grid

Written on June 15, 2011 at 12:30 am, by

A photographer and former Peace Corps volunteer in Ghana observes the beauty of the dark and the politics of electricity. (With video.)

On the Fly: Anna Deavere Smith

Written on June 15, 2011 at 12:15 am, by

Actress and playwright Anna Deavere Smith on “absorbing America,” “Nurse Jackie,” and her latest production, Let Me Down Easy.

God Bless You, Mr. Greybeard

Written on June 1, 2011 at 12:00 am, by

The iconic anthropologist and activist on what chimpanzees tell us about our ultimate destiny, the sixth great extinction, and reasons for hope.

Excavation

Written on May 15, 2011 at 12:00 am, by

The author Amitav Ghosh discusses the link between anthropology and writing, The New Yorker’s edit of his essay on the Iraq war, and John Updike’s worst book.

On the Fly: Mike Daisey

Written on May 15, 2011 at 12:00 am, by

Writer and monologist Mike Daisey describes his inspirations, working customer relations at Amazon, and his latest production, The Agony and Ecstasy of Steve Jobs.

Fear and Framing in Kashmir

Written on May 15, 2011 at 12:00 am, by

The filmmaker Tariq Tapa on growing up Jewish and Muslim in New York, saying the unsayable, and the future of horror films.

Full Metal Racket

Written on May 1, 2011 at 12:00 am, by

The Rolling Stone reporter on his blockbuster articles, how the generals pushed Obama into a war he didn’t want to fight, and the Pentagon’s effort to tear down the wall between PR and propaganda.

The Other Face of Silence

Written on May 1, 2011 at 12:00 am, by

The award-winning Palestinian director on his latest and most personal film, Israel’s moral army, and the power of silence.

On the Fly: Robert Reich

Written on April 15, 2011 at 12:00 am, by

The former Secretary of Labor on the Great Recession, class warfare, and why President Obama must challenge right-wing distortions with a counter-narrative.

The Straight Dope

Written on April 1, 2011 at 12:00 am, by

David Simon would be happy to find out that The Wire was hyperbolic and ridiculous, and that the “American Century” is still to come. But he's not betting on it.

La Estocada

Written on April 1, 2011 at 12:00 am, by

The famed American matador on Catalonia’s impending bullfighting ban, the art of killing well, and her friendships with Hemingway and Norman Mailer.

Selmeyyah

Written on March 15, 2011 at 11:04 am, by

Egyptian novelist and activist Ahdaf Soueif on when she knew the revolution would succeed, the role Al Jazeera and social networking played, and the irresponsible reporting on Lara Logan’s attack.

Runner

Written on March 15, 2011 at 12:08 am, by

Would you run in the Olympics for the country that occupied your birth country and refused to allow its independence? The subject of a forthcoming documentary on his contested homeland, the Western Sahara.

Capturing the Queen

Written on March 1, 2011 at 11:19 pm, by

The Pulitzer Prize-winning biographer discusses her latest book on Cleopatra that looks beyond tired mythologies surrounding the powerful queen.

Trans-Formative Change

Written on March 1, 2011 at 11:47 am, by

America’s first openly transgender law professor on the power of zines, the sacrifice social movements require, and the limits of legal reform.

The Un-Victim

Written on February 15, 2011 at 1:50 pm, by

In the wake of sedition threats by the Indian government, the writer and activist describes the stupidest question she gets asked, the cuss-word that made her respect the power of language, and the limits of preaching nonviolence.

For a Coming Extinction

Written on February 15, 2011 at 9:27 am, by

The U.S. poet laureate, W.S. Merwin, discusses his role in the antiwar movement, the quagmire of U.S. military occupations, today’s extinction rate, and efforts to conserve nature on Maui.

Palestine’s Great Book Robbery

Written on February 1, 2011 at 9:35 pm, by

The Israeli filmmaker on the need to reclaim Palestinian books looted by Israeli forces in 1948 and why Israel’s internal conflict gives him hope for peace.

We Are All Going to Die

Written on January 15, 2011 at 4:57 pm, by

One year after the earthquake that devastated her native Haiti, the novelist on rebuilding the island, art in a time of trouble, and inhabiting bodies.

Nearer to Truth than History

Written on January 1, 2011 at 6:58 pm, by

Reza Aslan on his groundbreaking anthology, the failure to build bridges between the West and Middle East, how poets can help, and the internet can’t.

Doing Everybody

Written on January 1, 2011 at 6:09 pm, by

Two star novelists on bringing back wrong and right, micro and macro writing, and David Foster Wallace.

Listen to the Banned

Written on December 15, 2010 at 12:48 pm, by

Just in time for the holidays, a new CD compiles a who’s who of banned musicians from around the world.

The Wrong Question

Written on December 15, 2010 at 12:44 pm, by

Journalist Joshua Phillips on the left media’s standard torture story, untrained soldiers making it up as they go, and becoming a suicide hotline.

The Earth is a Mosque

Written on December 1, 2010 at 6:59 pm, by

Two New York City Muslims discuss the Islamic imperative to care for the earth.

Updike Redux

Written on November 15, 2010 at 3:31 pm, by

In a previously unpublished interview, John Updike talks about Nabokov and his other literary heroes, why he wrote a book about a terrorist, and why he never expected to be a novelist.

A Kind of Flag-Planting

Written on November 15, 2010 at 11:21 am, by

On the heels of her second novel and fourth work of fiction, Bender considers magic and math, craft and discipline, and the influence of other writers and artists on her work.

The Wrong Side

Written on November 1, 2010 at 10:01 pm, by

The unrepentant revolutionary poet and Beat godfather, now 91, looks back at friendships with Ginsberg, Pablo Neruda, Fidel, and the Sandinistas—and asks when The Nation will publish his next poem.

Blood Without Guts

Written on October 1, 2010 at 5:12 pm, by

Why fight wars our president doesn’t believe in and we can’t pay for? asks retired colonel and military historian Andrew Bacevich.

Droning On

Written on October 1, 2010 at 11:37 am, by

From stepped up drone attacks, backsliding on torture, the Afghan surge, has Obama doubled down on Bush’s bets? Editor Joel Whitney interviews Tariq Ali on his new book. Recorded live at Asia Society.

Wolf in the Heart

Written on September 1, 2010 at 10:21 pm, by

The historian and departing Newsweek editor on how he (like Remnick and Keller) caught war fever after 9/11, the obsession with being a man, and how his dad glowed in Navy whites.

It Wasn’t a War

Written on August 1, 2010 at 6:04 pm, by

The Israel critic and Holocaust heir on the “Gaza massacre,” the Goldstone Report, the public turn against Israeli policy, and the difference between “of” and “in.”

Landslide

Written on August 1, 2010 at 5:18 pm, by

The Soviets were a menace to Georgian poet Titsian Tabidze’s generation. As his daughter and granddaughter recount, the legacy continues.

Between Riddle and Charm

Written on July 15, 2010 at 4:57 pm, by

The acclaimed poet, just before her stroke, on oil, the oral supremacy of poetry, and (what else?) the end of the world.

Part of Us that Can’t Be Touched

Written on July 1, 2010 at 10:20 pm, by

The novelist on Goon Squad, the drug-taking intensity of high school kids, and the Gothic novel.

Close-Up

Written on July 1, 2010 at 2:13 pm, by

The photorealist painter on how art collided with his learning disability, his first paintings after paralysis, and why you shouldn’t think he’s an asshole.

Captive

Written on June 15, 2010 at 11:11 pm, by

The former prisoner of the Colombian FARC on life in the jungle, coming to forgive, and Emmanuel, her son born in captivity.

Love in the Time of Capital

Written on June 1, 2010 at 5:51 pm, by

The rising intellectual star on how commodities create feelings, the modern lingua franca of therapy-speak, and Israel’s emotional style.

Sanctioning Disaster

Written on June 1, 2010 at 5:46 pm, by

The Burma expert defends aid, diplomacy, and “understanding” Burma’s dictators in order to improve human rights, sway softliners, and save lives.

Nazi Sheikhs

Written on May 15, 2010 at 11:18 pm, by

The polemicist discusses Tariq Ramadan’s love of extremist sheikhs, Islamism’s ties to Hitler, and the intellectual confusion of liberal journalists.

Black Sheep and Exploding Turbans

Written on May 15, 2010 at 11:36 am, by

Europe is struggling to come to terms with its Muslim minority. What are the consequences of the intolerance and the violence for the continent and for literature? Paul Berman and a lauded panel chime in.

Economics for the Rest of Us

Written on May 1, 2010 at 10:24 pm, by

Columbia professor Moshe Adler on why Main Street needs to take economics back from Wall Street.

A War You Can Commute To

Written on May 1, 2010 at 3:46 pm, by

Immersion journalist Ted Conover on how roads can be both a path to opportunity and a way bad things can arrive.

The Diversity Test

Written on April 28, 2010 at 9:34 am, by

Why were there only 8 women on the Modern Library’s 100 Best Novels of the Twentieth Century? Why is only 3% of the literature Americans read in translation?

The 700 Club

Written on April 15, 2010 at 5:43 pm, by

Skeptics cite 700 “scientists” who doubt global warming. Except few are climatologists. And Joseph Romm says they’re conducting the greatest disinformation campaign in history.

Byrne, Baby, Byrne

Written on April 15, 2010 at 9:32 am, by

The rock icon on song cycles, cycling, and escaping the past with Imelda Marcos. And you may ask yourself, is this my beautiful new business model?

Everything and Nothing

Written on April 1, 2010 at 4:23 pm, by

The iconic writer and activist on the similarities between Tibet and Palestine, womanism versus feminism, and Carl Jung.

A Carefully Crafted F**k You

Written on March 15, 2010 at 11:55 am, by

The gender-theorist-turned-philosopher-of-nonviolence discusses the choices that make people expendable, the violent foundation of nonviolent activism, and the role grief can play in setting a new course.

Generation, Gap

Written on March 1, 2010 at 8:41 pm, by

The financial watchdog on the trouble the American middle class is in, who’s responsible for it, and what needs to be done to get out of it.

Sweet Nothings

Written on February 15, 2010 at 11:14 am, by

Civil rights champion David Mixner on his battle to end “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell,” why the February 2nd Congressional hearings were a bust, and how the policy fosters sexual harassment of women soldiers.

Exile on Any Street

Written on February 1, 2010 at 5:03 pm, by

Are American readers insular, as the secretary of the Swedish Academy famously quipped? If so, why has immigrant fiction taken such a pivotal role in American letters? Irina Reyn hashes it out with lauded Bosnian author Aleksandar Hemon.

On the Emancipation of Women

Written on January 10, 2010 at 1:37 pm, by

Just as the 1800s were ripe for the abolition of slavery, this century will bring forces to bear on freeing women from violence, slavery, and oppression.

Worse than Cannibals

Written on January 1, 2010 at 11:22 pm, by

America’s most famous whistleblower on his willingness to go to jail, the pervasiveness of presidential lying, and why war is prolonged.

Taking Care of Wall Street

Written on December 1, 2009 at 8:50 pm, by

The Ohio Congresswoman (and the House’s longest-serving woman) on the vested interests in our broken system, how the bailout made things worse, and if she traded earmarks for donations.

The Meth Whisperer

Written on December 1, 2009 at 3:51 pm, by

Nick Reding on his book Methland, why newspapers got the meth crisis wrong, and how the “middle of America” will pull itself out of a twenty-five year bust.

Chomsky Half Full

Written on November 15, 2009 at 12:02 am, by

The controversial critic of U.S. foreign policy discusses his forthcoming book, the hypocrisy of neoliberalism, where he feels hopeful about democracy despite U.S. terrorism, and his friendship—okay, passing acquaintance—with Hugo Chavez and other “pink tide” presidents.

I Don’t Want To Fight

Written on November 1, 2009 at 12:53 am, by

Our November guest fiction editors discuss South Asian diaspora literature, war—and their fiction selections for Guernica.

Healthcare on the Moon

Written on October 6, 2009 at 9:50 pm, by

If this healthcare activist can deliver health care to the furthest corners of the developing world (and large swaths of the U.S.) why can’t Congress?

Wise Latina

Written on October 1, 2009 at 8:02 pm, by

The genre- and language-blending Mexican-American singer discusses “Indian-ness,” making music in the land of cultural chameleons, and says she may never be hip in the U.S. But her songs might be the most eloquent response yet to the likes of Joe “You Lie” Wilson.

Coming to Amreeka

Written on September 15, 2009 at 12:01 am, by

The filmmaker on her feel-good (sort of) movie, Palestinians in the Windy City, and how personal experiences can trump political arguments.

Shoot for the Legs

Written on September 7, 2009 at 5:51 pm, by

The West’s first Tibetan Buddhist monk on his friend the Dalai Lama, the nuance of forceful resistance, and how Hitler could have been defeated without violence.

Art and Arms

Written on September 1, 2009 at 8:59 pm, by

On the 70th anniversary of the start of WWII, the novelist discusses the oral histories of Jewish survivors, the Nazi looting of art, and Pictures at an Exhibition.

Last Temptation

Written on August 15, 2009 at 12:28 am, by

The former mouthpiece for insurance giant Cigna divulges his role in misleading the public, the emotional day that led to his whistle-blowing, and what should really scare you.

Nerdsmith

Written on July 7, 2009 at 11:07 pm, by

Before he disappears from the spotlight once more, Junot Diaz sets the record straight on immigration, identity, family, and the brief and wondrous origins of his novel’s title character.

In My Place

Written on July 1, 2009 at 1:39 pm, by

Pakistan’s dynasty-bashing heir apparent, Fatima Bhutto, discusses how Obama and corruption legitimize the Taliban, her work to include women in Pakistani politics, and why she will never run for office (it’s not why you think).

On the Beauty of Violence

Written on June 9, 2009 at 10:32 pm, by

On the twentieth anniversary of Geek Love, Dunn discusses her new book, the cultural value of boxing, and why some sports are superior to the arts.

Going Too Far

Written on June 9, 2009 at 9:50 pm, by

The longtime Africa correspondent discusses the Kenyan whistleblower who risked his life to end corruption, why she rejects Dambisa Moyo’s thesis about aid and democracy, and how she learned to love Paul Wolfowitz.

A Lousy Deal

Written on June 1, 2009 at 8:11 pm, by

On the twentieth anniversary of Tiananmen Square, the student leader made famous for scolding the premier in his hospital gown discusses life in exile, guilt over the students’ deaths, and how his movement was a mere first step toward greater political freedom in China.

The Genocide Myth

Written on May 12, 2009 at 10:23 pm, by

In his latest book, Mamdani attacks the Save Darfur Coalition as ahistorical and dishonest, and argues that the conflict in Darfur is more about land, power, and the environment than it is directly about race.

Standing Before History

Written on May 10, 2009 at 4:38 pm, by

On May 27, Shell goes to court over the 1995 execution of iconic Nigerian writer and environmental activist Ken Saro-Wiwa. His son, Ken Wiwa, Jr., and bestselling novelist Richard North Patterson discuss Saro-Wiwa’s legacy, Nigeria now, and the upcoming landmark trial.

Finding the Comfortable Spots

Written on May 1, 2009 at 9:59 pm, by

The emerging writer on the ideal reader, Abraham Lincoln as a shaman, how poetry and fiction go together, and the greatness of a mongoose.

We Need to Win

Written on April 13, 2009 at 8:04 pm, by

The environmental child prodigy on how the economy can benefit from green initiatives, why Canada and the U.S. must help lead the way, and the role for tribal peoples in conservation.

Our Reality Has Not Been Magical

Written on April 9, 2009 at 7:59 pm, by

With a newly-elected leftist government in El Salvador, exiled Salvadoran novelist Horacio Castellanos Moya is optimistic about the future of a country that once responded to his novels with death threats.

Aiding Is Abetting

Written on April 2, 2009 at 10:41 pm, by

International author and economist on ending western aid to Africa, what Bono and Geldof don't get, and the stifling of African independence and entrepreneurship.

Farmers and Chickens

Written on March 11, 2009 at 10:21 pm, by

The ICC’s lead prosecutor on the Court’s first arrest warrant for a sitting head of state, why his Court is nobody’s instrument but the law’s, and how he got his mother to see the light.

Tikkun Olam, Repairing the World

Written on February 15, 2009 at 10:10 pm, by

A Muslim and a Jewish firebrand challenge their respective religions to embrace doubt, democracy, and openness.

The Limits to My Self-Importance

Written on January 10, 2009 at 12:09 pm, by

The neo-conservative who coined “axis of evil” on how writing for the president is like writing for the movies, the administration’s “departures from the law,” and why the president should have brought in Democrats.

Christ Über Alles

Written on November 1, 2008 at 11:40 am, by

The religion reporter talks about his experiences with “the Family,” the secret Christ-loving, Hitler-quoting powerbrokers of the modern world.

Baghdad Nights

Written on November 1, 2008 at 11:33 am, by

What can a California geographer possibly teach us about the American troop surge and ethnic cleansing in Iraq?

How Soft is Smart

Written on October 8, 2008 at 7:02 pm, by

The author and statesman on the definition of soft power, why it's imperative to getting what a country wants, and which presidential candidate is better equipped to use it.

No Exit

Written on September 16, 2008 at 12:11 am, by

The election watchdog dissects why Las Vegas slot machines have more oversight than U.S. voting machines, and claims that Hillary Clinton's New Hampshire primary victory was rigged.

Cracked, Not Shattered

Written on August 23, 2008 at 12:28 pm, by

The congresswoman and author on the impact of Hillary's candidacy and the utter shortsightedness of voting for McCain; plus, the next big goal for women, and the importance of supportive fathers.

Roll Deep

Written on August 3, 2008 at 11:00 pm, by

Kill All Your Darlings and Low Life author Luc Sante on the majesty of rhythm, the primacy of surprise, and his cluelessness toward plot.

Crisis Darfur

Written on July 9, 2008 at 12:16 pm, by

(Part 2) Actor/activist Mia Farrow on the continued slaughter, China's role, and what we can do to help the people of Darfur

Healthscare

Written on June 11, 2008 at 3:15 pm, by

The former Pfizer veep-turned-whistleblower on how the pharmaceutical industry is like the mob, the sad state of U.S. healthcare, and his fruitless attempts at finding work.

Patriot Missile

Written on May 12, 2008 at 12:13 pm, by

The punk rock icon discusses debating the soldiers in Iraq, Sean Hannity's lack of courage, and the incalculable influence of Chuck D

Houses at Night

Written on February 8, 2008 at 11:38 am, by

Rock-star poet John Ashbery on pop art, manifestos, and feeling like a foreigner in America.

Man with a Country

Written on February 5, 2008 at 6:02 pm, by

Iran's USA scholar says it's not just American politics that demonize Iran, it's the culture, including books and films

Breaking into the Spell

Written on February 5, 2008 at 10:47 am, by

The queen of science fiction on war, the problem with literary realism and learning to write as a woman

The Consequences

Written on January 5, 2008 at 10:23 pm, by

The recent National Book Award winner on how poets and poetry can best engage the world.

Inequality is the Drug

Written on December 15, 2007 at 2:20 pm, by

It would surprise most people to know that slave labor is just as prevalent in America as anywhere else in the world. Here John Bowe, the author of Nobodies, sheds light on America’s dirty secret and why it still exists.

Thrilling Difficulty

Written on November 1, 2007 at 11:10 pm, by

The poet who refuses to call himself a poet on his hatred of dumbing it down and the musician he might have been.

Graffiti or Vermeer?

Written on September 12, 2007 at 12:38 am, by

Aesop Rock on hip-hop, the intelligentsia, and being a mad scientist

Intensity of a Plot

Written on July 17, 2007 at 9:44 am, by

The author of the proto-9/11 novel deconstructs terrorism, fiction, and his inability to carry a tune.

Powerful Acts

Written on July 9, 2007 at 1:28 pm, by

The actress cum activist on her campaign to end genocide in Darfur, and how China, Steven Spielberg and Kofi Annan have stood in her way

First Victims of Freedom

Written on May 1, 2007 at 10:37 am, by

Iraq's most tenacious feminist says the U.S. war and its aftermath have completely disenfranchised women.

Incoherence of Power

Written on April 25, 2007 at 5:11 pm, by

The signs were there; but the Bush administration looked away

America’s Century of Regime Change

Written on March 20, 2007 at 7:28 pm, by

Iraq was not the first time, just the first time we all watched it happen

Infidel

Written on February 27, 2007 at 12:47 pm, by

Islam’s toughest critic on her new book, the Axis of Evil, and the neoconservatives’ moral high ground

Different Ways of Laughing

Written on February 27, 2007 at 11:11 am, by

In his 800th anniversary year, Rumi is the best selling poet in America; a talk with his most prominent English translator

Unintelligent Design

Written on January 18, 2007 at 8:51 pm, by

The economic boom in China has meant the rise virtually overnight of a slew of new cities. But what are the costs? A talk with the artist/photographer on hyper-urbanization in China, with his photographs

Writing Without Borders

Written on January 14, 2007 at 4:37 pm, by

The author discusses his decision to become a writer, the relationship between the individual and a nation, and his work as an opera librettist.

This Mere Guy

Written on October 27, 2006 at 10:05 am, by

The poet on his apprenticeship to Bidart, developing an effective "camouflage" and where the self lives in poetry.

Window

Written on September 11, 2006 at 1:07 pm, by

The photographer on working in series, the personal roots of his current project, "Window," and September 11th.

Giant Killer

Written on August 25, 2006 at 5:49 pm, by

The anti-Hillary candidate on the deaf media, war opportunism and building a progressive infrastructure.

George Saunders: Dig the Hole

Written on August 11, 2006 at 1:55 pm, by

The acclaimed author on science fiction, collaborating with Ben Stiller, and how Ayn Rand almost made him an architect.

Share the Wealth, or Share the Poverty

Written on July 5, 2006 at 1:13 pm, by

The author/activist on the politics of natural gas in Bolivia

A Brisk Walk

Written on June 14, 2006 at 5:12 pm, by

The former poet laureate on attacking pretension, daring to be accessible, and i-poetry.

Who is John Conyers?

Written on May 22, 2006 at 4:25 pm, by

As Republicans attempt to preemptively discredit the Congress’s oversight role, Conyers discusses why he won’t let go

Warming to Reality

Written on May 22, 2006 at 9:56 am, by

The author/journalist on climate change in a culture of denial

Seeing Things Straight

Written on April 15, 2006 at 4:58 pm, by

The acclaimed author on giving up control, how she processed the loss of her husband, and becoming a playwright

Built Green

Written on April 10, 2006 at 5:03 pm, by

Is post-September 11th New York on the verge of becoming the world’s greenest city?

The Crossing Over

Written on April 1, 2006 at 11:07 am, by

The U.S. poet laureate on the aesthetic of the simple poem

Gods of History

Written on March 16, 2006 at 2:24 pm, by

"They’re looking down upon us after Rwanda, saying, 'You know, we’re going to give you another chance. This time we’re gonna give you lots of time.'"

Fooled Again—Who Won in ’04 and Why It Matters Now

Written on February 20, 2006 at 3:33 pm, by

"Americans aren’t so stupid, after all, as to re-elect this guy."

Spinning Us to Death

Written on January 30, 2006 at 12:15 pm, by

The columnist and author on the current war with Iraq and the next one with...

Mask of the Critic

Written on January 30, 2006 at 12:09 pm, by

The critic and the artist on Christo, political art, and the toggle between looking and reading

The Devil’s Advocate

Written on December 19, 2005 at 9:19 pm, by

The former deputy assistant attorney general on his new book, the Geneva Conventions and the legal case for torture

This Girl Is Taking Bets

Written on November 1, 2005 at 10:57 am, by

The British singer on the folk tradition, American politics, and the social responsibility of the artist.

Yes

Written on October 24, 2005 at 7:50 pm, by

The innovative writer/director discusses her latest film, venturing into uncharted territory, and how A.O. Scott got her movie wrong.

Telling Details

Written on September 26, 2005 at 11:32 pm, by

Banks discusses his time in Students for a Democratic Society, finding a narrator's voice, and his (brief) acting career.

Accumulation of Heartbreak

Written on August 25, 2005 at 12:52 am, by

What the Muslim gaze westward has seen during the invasion and occupation of Iraq.

“The Legit Heir to the Throne”

Written on August 24, 2005 at 4:23 pm, by

The pianist and arranger talks about winning a Grammy, being an indy favorite and the state of salsa today.

Jose Padilla? Indict Him Already

Written on August 14, 2005 at 11:54 pm, by

Newman discusses Padilla's case, his state of mind and why the Bush administration's position sets an ugly precedent.

The Distance Between Us

Written on August 14, 2005 at 12:12 am, by

The author of Everything is Illuminated, on the verge of a film release and an opera debut, talks about his new book.

Nicholas Kristof: The Crisis of Our Times

Written on June 28, 2005 at 7:05 pm, by

"What I learned from him was that you could perhaps better tell the story of a place by writing of a tiny village as a sort of prism into the bigger issues the culture was facing."

Writing the Playwright

Written on June 28, 2005 at 12:05 pm, by

"In a sense, I feel like the job of the artist at all times is essentially the same, which is simply to tell the truth. I mean, I’m nervous about any prescriptions for what a writer should or shouldn’t do."

Samantha Power: Witness to Genocide

Written on May 2, 2005 at 12:41 am, by

"The only long-term way that the terrorist threat will be neutralized is to improve human dignity, and shore up failed states like Afghanistan, like Darfur, so that they don’t become a breeding ground for more people hostile to the United States."

Oscar Arias Sánchez: President of Peace

Written on May 1, 2005 at 1:02 am, by

As he gears up for another term as president, Costa Rica’s Oscar Arias talks about waging peace, winning the Nobel, and quips, “Al Qaeda has received a great deal of support and training over the years from the U.S. What’s important about mentioning these connections is to prevent the same mistake from being repeated again.”

The Fragile Scaffolding of Human Rights

Written on January 25, 2005 at 5:28 pm, by

"Terrorists act as they do because they don't have great power at their easy disposal. The result is that they rely upon the ability to exploit the mistakes of others."

On Translating the Prince of Wits

Written on January 25, 2005 at 5:16 pm, by

"Yes, I think we have to be faithful to the context," says the translator of the Quijote. "But it's very important to differentiate between fidelity and literalness."

The Hard-To-Say

Written on October 27, 2004 at 7:53 pm, by

"Poetry articulates and enacts the difficult-to-say, the half-known; it finds a music and a shape, offers an arrangement of words and sentences that better approximate the way things are."

A People’s History of Howard Zinn

Written on October 27, 2004 at 7:47 pm, by

"Historians hate to make predictions."