Category Archives: spotlight

The Future of Cities

Written on June 15, 2016 at 12:13 am, by

A Guernica special issue.

Where There Is No Water and Nothing Grows

Written on June 15, 2016 at 12:12 am, by

The Future of Cities: If the reason Haiti suffers is just bad luck, some voodoo curse, then maybe we bear no responsibility, maybe we can confine it to some distant dimension.

Beautiful Objects, Blighted Spaces

Written on June 15, 2016 at 12:11 am, by

The Future of Cities: The Chicago-based urban design team on rebuilding neighborhoods, gentrification, and the “magic” of Theaster Gates.

Rich Eyes and Poor Hands

Written on June 15, 2016 at 12:10 am, by

The Future of Cities: In the aftermath of the most recent attacks in Paris, the writer considers a city wavering between gravity and light.

Opportunity for the Unknown

Written on June 15, 2016 at 12:09 am, by

The Future of Cities: The city planner on what Rio’s favelas can teach global cities, when communities become brands, and the value of informality.

Cities of the Future

Written on June 15, 2016 at 12:08 am, by

The Future of Cities: Ten writers on the places they immigrated from, returned to, remember, call home.

Women, Winning

Written on June 15, 2016 at 12:07 am, by

The Future of Cities: The journalist and She Shapes the City co-founder on the women behind Nairobi’s rapidly changing identity.

Surveillance Revisited

Written on June 15, 2016 at 12:06 am, by

The Future of Cities: The ICP curator on urban panopticons, humans as data, and the selfie.

A Changeless Place

Written on June 15, 2016 at 12:05 am, by

The Future of Cities: The artist on his portraits of disaster, invoking empathy, and Godzilla as “the loneliest guy in the world.”

DOB

Written on June 15, 2016 at 12:04 am, by

Future of Cities: “Department of Buildings,” said Frank. “We have a complaint. Can we come in?”

Friend of the Indians

Written on June 15, 2016 at 12:03 am, by

The Future of Cities: “There are hundreds, perhaps a thousand empty villages in Spain like your Valdaves: abandoned, then forgotten. I find them new owners...”

Migrant Is Not a Metaphor

Written on June 15, 2016 at 12:01 am, by

The Future of Cities: A migrant learns to love as mothers do, / by trying and trying again.

This Machine Called the Camera

Written on June 1, 2016 at 12:07 am, by

The photographer of Tiananmen Square’s “Tank Man” on creating art that “gets inside you.”

A Second Start

Written on June 1, 2016 at 12:05 am, by

The Danish filmmaker discusses refugee children in Denmark, the safety of schools, and the quiet power of the observer.

I Am A Rock

Written on June 1, 2016 at 12:03 am, by

Whenever the latest woe is me commercial came on hawking the newest painkiller, Mami commanded our attention: “That’s me!”

Tenebrae

Written on June 1, 2016 at 12:02 am, by

Praise instead the night, / it’s starless, basilica void.

Let’s Not Begin

Written on June 1, 2016 at 12:01 am, by

Worry and console, worry / and console: it’s how I stay / in shape.

Vital Signs

Written on May 16, 2016 at 12:09 am, by

She lost a piece of her brain and will never get it back.

Never the End

Written on May 16, 2016 at 12:08 am, by

“When you approach the second half of your life, you start to unconsciously consider what you’re passing on.”

Kiss of Death

Written on May 16, 2016 at 12:07 am, by

What does a neglected disease tell us about who we choose to take care of and why?

The Gaming Guru

Written on May 16, 2016 at 12:06 am, by

The Chinese video game artist on emotion-centered play, collaboration beyond language, and the next generation of indie blockbusters.

Touch the Tile

Written on May 16, 2016 at 12:05 am, by

The artist discusses sewn paintings, tiled murals, and viewer inhibitions.

Shut Your Mouth, Hélène

Written on May 16, 2016 at 12:04 am, by

‘Keep your pecker in your pocket, Paddy,’ Jacques Aubry says, pointing at Mrs. Boyle’s swollen front, ‘and you’ll have less need for marching.’

Rutting Season

Written on May 16, 2016 at 12:03 am, by

He lay in the dark, eyes closed, imagining what Lisa would say when she saw the gun. Would she beg?

Tassiopeia

Written on May 16, 2016 at 12:02 am, by

I came out / hot as a punched jaw

Asylum

Written on May 16, 2016 at 12:01 am, by

They said burn the keys / but only our hair caught fire.

Be the Kill-Joy

Written on May 2, 2016 at 12:09 am, by

The performance artists on the racial history of drag, jokes as a means of survival, and leaving room for paradox.

They Call Him Rrat

Written on May 2, 2016 at 12:08 am, by

The unlikely bond between a hospice volunteer and a dying Vietnam veteran.

Forget You’re Watching a Play

Written on May 2, 2016 at 12:07 am, by

The director of Eclipsed on bringing the first all-female production to Broadway.

A Slight Risk

Written on May 2, 2016 at 12:06 am, by

An American pregnancy in Manila.

At Soil Level

Written on May 2, 2016 at 12:05 am, by

The visual artist on working with seeds and seeing the world anew.

Moscow Windows

Written on May 2, 2016 at 12:04 am, by

An unimaginably endless life lay ahead of me, almost frighteningly so. Sometimes, when I thought about it, I became so agitated that I found it difficult to breathe.

Manifesto

Written on May 2, 2016 at 12:03 am, by

“My brave little Marxist,” she will coo, knowing that her own, modest attempts at domestic revolution will as usual come to nothing, and softening in spite of it.

A Soldier

Written on May 2, 2016 at 12:02 am, by

the melting seconds of your longing / in the brown of a military shirt

She Walked In / She Walked Out

Written on May 2, 2016 at 12:01 am, by

Whatever you touched grew more like itself

Trying to Get Right

Written on April 15, 2016 at 12:10 am, by

The breakthrough addiction medication and the doctors who risk everything to prescribe it.

The Language of Regime

Written on April 15, 2016 at 12:09 am, by

The journalist on reporting from a post-revolutionary Iran and tracing the rich ferment of its intellectual and social history.

My Father’s Aleppo

Written on April 15, 2016 at 12:08 am, by

An exodus, a return, and the questions that follow.

Upending the Archive

Written on April 15, 2016 at 12:07 am, by

The genre-bending writer on queering history and restoring lost voices to American fiction.

Natural Birth in the New America

Written on April 15, 2016 at 12:06 am, by

Ina May Gaskin’s Spiritual Midwifery and the back-to-the-land movement.

Lovely Decorative Tentacles

Written on April 15, 2016 at 12:05 am, by

The little-known book illustrations of Henri Matisse.

Heat & Light

Written on April 15, 2016 at 12:04 am, by

Fortified with sock tea, he attends his morning group, which is called Steps. This to distinguish it from the afternoon group, which is called Group.

Migrations

Written on April 15, 2016 at 12:03 am, by

Bulgarians are physical people. I discovered that when I left and came to New York.

Question of Origins

Written on April 15, 2016 at 12:02 am, by

Each fossil / is overburdened with life

How Easy to Live with Choice

Written on April 15, 2016 at 12:01 am, by

Oh it’s / a gold rush of expectations this place.

The Pretensions of Pop

Written on April 1, 2016 at 12:09 am, by

A look at the secret, defining force in a field largely comprised of autodidacts and bedroom enthusiasts

Beyond Objects, Beyond Scores

Written on April 1, 2016 at 12:08 am, by

The musician and composer­ on the art of self-transformation, resisting cultures of exclusion, and what he calls ‘easy camaraderie.’

Running Still

Written on April 1, 2016 at 12:07 am, by

Obsession as symptom, cause, and cure.

The Full Texture of a City

Written on April 1, 2016 at 12:06 am, by

India's premier graphic novelist on street hustlers and the perils of cosmopolitanism.

Step In

Written on April 1, 2016 at 12:04 am, by

Here’s Jacob, in the grip of incomparable sorrow, being a total jaggoff to his friend. Insert interior monologue: What am I doing? When did I become such a dick?

A Bridged Country

Written on April 1, 2016 at 12:03 am, by

It wasn’t like we hadn’t grown accustomed to male wooers after Pa danced his way out of the picture, but something about Casero, that old bag, pissed me off.

Apocalypse with Bed Sheets

Written on April 1, 2016 at 12:02 am, by

I pick him up, / and he unravels / into a sheet.

Hyel’s Zumbi

Written on April 1, 2016 at 12:01 am, by

Call his neck plum, when it bruises / say the skin makes it easy to digest.

The Future of Language

Written on March 15, 2016 at 12:12 am, by

A Guernica special issue.

Teach Me to Be Me

Written on March 15, 2016 at 12:11 am, by

Future of Language: We wanted to make Kenya our literary base from which to engage with the world.

Deep Sounds

Written on March 15, 2016 at 12:10 am, by

Future of Language: The biologist and whale expert on cetacean diversity, listening to whales, and the possibility of culture in nature.

Distant Brains

Written on March 15, 2016 at 12:09 am, by

Future of Language: Scientists are experimenting with ways for people to communicate using only their minds. But at what cost?

Living in a Briefcase House

Written on March 15, 2016 at 12:08 am, by

Future of Language: The architect discusses the language of aesthetics and telling a story through a body of work.

What Makes Alaska Alaska

Written on March 15, 2016 at 12:07 am, by

Future of Language: The Native language activists discuss cultural incubation, intergenerational learning, and the role of legislation.

Thick of Tongue

Written on March 15, 2016 at 12:06 am, by

Future of Language: So what exactly is this “black sound” I am insisting exists?

The Footsteps of Dance Poetry

Written on March 15, 2016 at 12:05 am, by

Future of Language: Our human identity has been described as atoms dancing, a living poem, a moving message…

Wife!

Written on March 15, 2016 at 12:04 am, by

Future of Language: WIFE!—who would not tolerate this complaint of his, who no longer indulged his talking, who could not even bear to look at him.

Snow Signs

Written on March 15, 2016 at 12:03 am, by

Future of Language: Your given signs and pairs: mouth, kisses, red-pink, drink-apple, hurry-go. You have no tenses, only momentum into what’s before you.

Straight to the jawline bloody Igor

Written on March 15, 2016 at 12:02 am, by

Future of Language: Trumpets skyward, you know about it, side eye, you know how goes silence in the rock-n-roll

Twentieth-First Century

Written on March 15, 2016 at 12:01 am, by

Future of Language: I vote with my feet. I vote with my wallet. / I vote in person with my vote.

The Buddha of Kabul

Written on March 1, 2016 at 12:09 am, by

At Tepe Naranj, archaeologist Zafar Paiman is working to preserve the remnants of an ancient monastery—and the memory of Afghanistan’s Buddhist past.

Dignity Through Narrative

Written on March 1, 2016 at 12:08 am, by

“Think about the last time you read a novel in which someone went to cash a benefit check or paid for food in food stamps.”

Mother is Marxist

Written on March 1, 2016 at 12:07 am, by

The market scans my child, calculates pecuniary value.

Bodies of Revolution

Written on March 1, 2016 at 12:06 am, by

Female leaders from around the globe trade notes on building a new women’s solidarity movement.

The Wealth of Nations

Written on March 1, 2016 at 12:05 am, by

Nigerian artist Victor Ehikhamenor fills oil drums with the trauma of national memory.

The Tale of the Hag

Written on March 1, 2016 at 12:04 am, by

Her feet were brown. She ambled closer. Darling, I’m you, she said. I’m you from the future.

Hera, Say Hello

Written on March 1, 2016 at 12:02 am, by

Why, among this applause, 
/ have I become so small in this life

There’s no such thing as a free symphony

Written on March 1, 2016 at 12:01 am, by

We reap / such risky skills from childhood

Istanbul’s Wandering Songbirds

Written on February 15, 2016 at 12:10 am, by

Street vendors are outlaws by definition.

What We Owe History

Written on February 15, 2016 at 12:09 am, by

“An essay is something that tracks the evolution of the human mind.”

Making a Monstress

Written on February 15, 2016 at 12:08 am, by

The author on writing for Marvel, race and invisibility, and the radicality of romance novels.

Deadly Decisions

Written on February 15, 2016 at 12:07 am, by

The authors of The Good Death and Five Days at Memorial discuss disaster preparedness, impossible health care choices, and the notion of journalistic objectivity.

Slow Thinking

Written on February 15, 2016 at 12:06 am, by

An Unnatural Pursuit.

Remembering Leila Alaoui

Written on February 15, 2016 at 12:05 am, by

The work and lasting legacy of the young photographer killed in the Burkina Faso terrorist attack.

High Dive

Written on February 15, 2016 at 12:04 am, by

Male staff members at the Grand waded through the myths that surrounded her, enjoying the feeling of being stuck.

The Naked Maja, or La Petit Mort

Written on February 15, 2016 at 12:03 am, by

“You’re delicious,” he says, meaning it, remembering the taste of mango.

the underworld

Written on February 15, 2016 at 12:02 am, by

your sad eyes are a river / the locals know not to swim

Visions

Written on February 15, 2016 at 12:01 am, by

Cousin, I have had a premonition.

Up in Arms

Written on February 1, 2016 at 12:09 am, by

The artist and journalist on reporting from Guantánamo Bay and Syria, glamor as a subversive power, and neutrality and boredom as weapons of the state.

To Anyang

Written on February 1, 2016 at 12:08 am, by

Lost for words in the cradle of Chinese civilization.

The Trouble With Empathy

Written on February 1, 2016 at 12:07 am, by

My complaint is against empathy as a moral guide. But as a source of pleasure, it can’t be beat.

Take My Name and Say It Slow

Written on February 1, 2016 at 12:06 am, by

"But where are you really from?" they ask, and I never know who to answer for, Thomas or Nuocheng?

Female Gazing

Written on February 1, 2016 at 12:05 am, by

The artist on primal super identities, photographing migrants, and motherhood as a source of creative power.

Treasure Hunters

Written on February 1, 2016 at 12:04 am, by

So you’re the hotshot diver, he said, if you won’t take any money, let me buy you a hot dog.

Man on the Bus with a Spider on His Back

Written on February 1, 2016 at 12:03 am, by

There's a man on the bus sitting directly in front of you. He has a small brown spider crawling across his red shirt, near his left shoulder blade.

From L’Heure Bleue, or The Judy Poems

Written on February 1, 2016 at 12:02 am, by

it’s good to remember / how much it hurts

White Boy Time Machine: Software

Written on February 1, 2016 at 12:01 am, by

b u t w h e r e a r e y o u r e a l l y f r o m ? / yesterday is the wrong answer, tomorrow too

The Face of Ferrante

Written on January 15, 2016 at 12:09 am, by

The translator discusses public secrets, private identities, and the final Neapolitan novel.

The Nostalgia Aesthetic

Written on January 15, 2016 at 12:08 am, by

How the “Keep Calm and Carry On” poster became a global design icon.

Slow Burn

Written on January 15, 2016 at 12:07 am, by

The Philippine cinema pioneer on why films are “the greatest mirror of humanity’s struggle.”

Intricate Lives

Written on January 15, 2016 at 12:06 am, by

The author on depicting female friendship and fielding questions about unlikable characters.

Material Effects

Written on January 15, 2016 at 12:05 am, by

The artists on cultural appropriation, performance as participation, and the struggle with modernity.

Blue Underworld

Written on January 15, 2016 at 12:04 am, by

Area 51 has been hidden from the American people. For a long time. For their own good.

Square Wave

Written on January 15, 2016 at 12:03 am, by

It seared their eyes. Squinting, they watched the light dilate, divide in six. The rocket fell away, limp, useless, and dark as a new star grew against the storm.

In Vitro

Written on January 15, 2016 at 12:02 am, by

hair as unreal / as a doll built by hand / in the hold of beautiful ship

Lessons on Expulsion

Written on January 15, 2016 at 12:01 am, by

This grain, this / wild greedy thing

The Boundaries of Nations

Written on December 15, 2015 at 12:12 am, by

A Guernica special issue.

One Song

Written on December 15, 2015 at 12:10 am, by

Boundaries of Nations: The director on depicting the African migrant experience in Italy, moving in with his film’s lead, and the “common language” of pop music.

Returning to Ethiopia

Written on December 15, 2015 at 12:09 am, by

Boundaries of Nations: Exile had long since ceased to be a temporary condition, but what I hadn’t known was that, like love, it could deepen with time.

Seeing Cities

Written on December 15, 2015 at 12:08 am, by

Boundaries of Nations: The researchers on the politics of mapmaking, rethinking invisibility, and why dots are changing the way we look at cultural borders.

Among Strangers

Written on December 15, 2015 at 12:07 am, by

Boundaries of Nations: Traveling the globe to research the buying and selling of passports, a reporter reflects on arbitrary citizenship and what it means to be “from somewhere.”

Children of War

Written on December 15, 2015 at 12:06 am, by

Boundaries of Nations: The author and activist on growing up under siege in Sarajevo and chronicling the childhood memories of other survivors.

Locating Cuba

Written on December 15, 2015 at 12:05 am, by

Boundaries of Nations: The scholar and author on Cuban contemporary art and how changing US-Cuba diplomacy may impact the art world.

Amerikanka

Written on December 15, 2015 at 12:04 am, by

Boundaries of Nations: What a joke American pool is. They play with miniature sticks on a tiny table with a bunch of tiny multicolored balls, a bunch of toy balls, just like between their American legs.

Shakespeare, New Mexico

Written on December 15, 2015 at 12:03 am, by

Boundaries of Nations: With time, I learned to love and master my scenes.

[I too drag around tin cans]

Written on December 15, 2015 at 12:02 am, by

Boundaries of Nations: I too fear / invisible drunken singers, I too fear / white horses.

5 Queen’s Road

Written on December 1, 2015 at 12:09 am, by

A house is partitioned along the lines, and in the chaos, of the new independent nations of India and Pakistan.

Body Politic

Written on December 1, 2015 at 12:08 am, by

The performance artist on going solo, inhabiting dangerous spaces, and the grotesqueness of time.

The Book Lady of Kabul

Written on December 1, 2015 at 12:07 am, by

Block by block she maneuvers through the teeming sidewalks of Kabul’s Shar-E-Naw shopping district until she enters Ice-Milk Restaurant, stops at tables.

The Future Perfect

Written on December 1, 2015 at 12:06 am, by

The novelist on what atheists and true believers have in common and how Mark Twain, Henry James, and “Sigmund-fucking-Freud” lack imagination.

Faith Need Not Fear Reason

Written on December 1, 2015 at 12:05 am, by

The artist on his current New York solo exhibition, inspired by the religious coexistence of a more peaceful era.

The Men and Women Like Him

Written on December 1, 2015 at 12:04 am, by

A year ago he brought the pox blankets back to the natives after a well-meaning group of illegal tourists stole them away. On return he had a sort of quiet breakdown.

Souterrain

Written on December 1, 2015 at 12:03 am, by

He led her away, down one tunnel, then another. He took her through a passage where the bones were piled so high they had to wriggle over them on their bellies.

Annie Scrubs Motel Floors

Written on December 1, 2015 at 12:02 am, by

there was no sex & the bruises / were Boy’s way of saying no, then yes, then no again

The Parable of the Wayward Child

Written on December 1, 2015 at 12:01 am, by

All her life as if / she in a race with ruin.

Life as We Write It

Written on November 16, 2015 at 12:08 am, by

The author on what evolutionary science can teach us about art and literature, his enduring interest in Nabokov, and why a good joke never dies.

Hidden in a Suitcase

Written on November 16, 2015 at 12:07 am, by

In search of the mother who gave her up for adoption, the author finds six siblings instead. Decades later, she contemplates the drug addiction that cost many of them their lives.

What If?

Written on November 16, 2015 at 12:06 am, by

The playwright and novelist on state censorship in Egypt, women in revolutions, and writing as an act of hope.

Surrealist Visions

Written on November 16, 2015 at 12:05 am, by

Three contemporary Egyptian artists take the self as subject in exploring post-revolution politics.

The Road to Alpullu

Written on November 16, 2015 at 12:04 am, by

I would examine the black and white photographs of Alpullu’s golden age. In their shadows, I identified the vanished town.

Toren

Written on November 16, 2015 at 12:03 am, by

Then high school came, and my brother and I didn’t talk. I was some bitch-majesty in the schoolyard, and whoever said all tomboys are loved has never been a tomboy.

The Saints of the Last Days

Written on November 16, 2015 at 12:02 am, by

Pray that on this evenfall, bees will fly thick / from her mouth.

I From Absolute Solitude

Written on November 16, 2015 at 12:01 am, by

I believe they are many, and some are beautiful and deserve to live.

Fiction Tells a Truth That History Cannot

Written on November 2, 2015 at 12:09 am, by

On being mentored by Breyten Breytenbach and Paul Bowles.

The Language of Movement

Written on November 2, 2015 at 12:08 am, by

The artist on multi-channel video work, the communicative potential of sound, and contemporizing performance traditions.

An Art Without an Artwork

Written on November 2, 2015 at 12:07 am, by

A summer of chess in Bryant Park.

Drawing Dissent

Written on November 2, 2015 at 12:06 am, by

The political cartoonist on his new biography of Edward Snowden and living in an Orwellian age.

Radical Realism

Written on November 2, 2015 at 12:05 am, by

An exhibition at the Jewish Museum brings together a group of largely unknown artists creating provocative and unexpected work.

The Way You Look at Me

Written on November 2, 2015 at 12:04 am, by

The husband wrote a letter every single day, sometimes more often. Sometimes, she didn’t open them, or deliberately misread them.

The Things They Carried

Written on November 2, 2015 at 12:03 am, by

They needed a way to keep the fire going until morning—that was another thing they had on their minds.

Charon’s Obol

Written on November 2, 2015 at 12:02 am, by

The truth is / I’d tongue the honey from most any hand / that granted me a crossing.

Art

Written on November 2, 2015 at 12:01 am, by

Everything is art / to be broken.

Moving the Needle

Written on October 15, 2015 at 12:08 am, by

The filmmaker and journalist on the future of girls’ education in Afghanistan, “white savior narratives,” and documentary as an antidote to compassion fatigue.

Death of a Valley

Written on October 15, 2015 at 12:07 am, by

In 1953, California sacrificed a town to stave its own thirst. But the act was futile, and the state is thirstier than ever.

The Afterlife of Waste

Written on October 15, 2015 at 12:06 am, by

The Turkish artist on moving to the epicenter of throwaway culture and imagining the life-forms that “might emerge out of the contemporary ooze.”

No Noise, Only Sound

Written on October 15, 2015 at 12:05 am, by

The late avant-garde composer’s Diary offers his musings on politics, prose, and the strange condition of being human.

Thugs

Written on October 15, 2015 at 12:04 am, by

In the deserted thoroughfares I heard the rumble of thug music, heavy with bass and shot through with electric guitar.

Lifesavers

Written on October 15, 2015 at 12:03 am, by

When I met G I knew he’d figure in my life heavily, but I had no idea if our association would be sad or happy, ultimately—and I still don’t know which it will be, ultimately.

Suture

Written on October 15, 2015 at 12:02 am, by

Every day a heart is pulled / out like a wet plum from one body / and placed inside another.

Sita Considers Her Rebellions

Written on October 15, 2015 at 12:01 am, by

She has killed things / (though it is forbidden) with her hands

On Mercy

Written on October 1, 2015 at 12:09 am, by

Reconciling a death sentence, from a pediatric cancer ward to death row.

Women in the World

Written on October 1, 2015 at 12:08 am, by

A leading researcher on the need to rescript our narratives about women and the environment.

The Author Is Purely a Name

Written on October 1, 2015 at 12:07 am, by

Fragments on writing, publishing, and being an anonymous worldwide phenomenon.

Drawing From Life and Death

Written on October 1, 2015 at 12:06 am, by

The graphic novelist on coming of age in his comics, portraying Asian-American characters, and laying bare the anxieties of fatherhood.

The Shark’s Fin

Written on October 1, 2015 at 12:05 am, by

A new documentary follows three climbers up one of the world’s most challenging peaks to explore the depths of commitment, passion, and calculated risk.

Water Butterfly

Written on October 1, 2015 at 12:04 am, by

No one knows when exactly he became the thing I fed upon, the thing whose body works for my body, day and night.

A Bunch of Savages

Written on October 1, 2015 at 12:03 am, by

I have a birthmark above my butt, which is undeniable proof of gypsiness.

The Last Breath

Written on October 1, 2015 at 12:02 am, by

This party has no history.

Whatever We Name, We Exceed

Written on October 1, 2015 at 12:01 am, by

these things I try to name each day / were never mine to lose.

The Boundaries of Nature

Written on September 15, 2015 at 12:12 am, by

A Guernica special issue.

Landscapes of Exclusion

Written on September 15, 2015 at 12:10 am, by

Boundaries of Nature: The cultural geographer on the misunderstood relationship between people of color and nature, and how place shapes identity.

Splitting the Moon

Written on September 15, 2015 at 12:09 am, by

Boundaries of Nature: A physicist considers the appeal of miracles.

Learning to Listen

Written on September 15, 2015 at 12:08 am, by

Boundaries of Nature: The acoustic ecologist on his fight to preserve dying soundscapes, how ambient noise affects the psyche, and recasting silence as a presence.

The Age of Loneliness

Written on September 15, 2015 at 12:07 am, by

Boundaries of Nature: When have humans ever looked at something we need, or even just want, and walked away?

At Home in the Universe

Written on September 15, 2015 at 12:06 am, by

Boundaries of Nature: The scientist and writer on gender bias in the sciences and inventing new geometric forms through crochet.

The Unknowing

Written on September 15, 2015 at 12:05 am, by

Boundaries of Nature: The visual artist on the landscape of her native Canada, exhibiting at a nuclear power plant, and seeking to destabilize the familiar.

Hell Kettle

Written on September 15, 2015 at 12:04 am, by

Boundaries of Nature: Water is always at work. We don’t even know that it’s eating the very ground from under us.

The Last of His Kind

Written on September 15, 2015 at 12:03 am, by

Boundaries of Nature: In books, he has read about boys and animals, how they form a connection, and then the animal dies. And the boy learns something about the harshness of the world.

preservation tactics

Written on September 15, 2015 at 12:02 am, by

Boundaries of Nature: an orange, plucked, a fester, a fist— / we eat dead things to stay alive

The World’s Oldest Cherry Tree Is Alive and Well but Barely Able to Walk

Written on September 15, 2015 at 12:01 am, by

Boundaries of Nature: Underfoot, / the spring grass was an animal whose fur must never be cut.

Scenes From the End of the World

Written on September 1, 2015 at 12:09 am, by

The writer and photographer on their first book collaboration, the connection between Hollywood blockbusters and climate change, and how “shared terror” can make us feel less alone.

History Is Who You’ve Lost

Written on September 1, 2015 at 12:08 am, by

I, without knowing, dreamed parts of a truth. One part is this: my grandfather on my mother’s side was a murderer. Or was he?

The Alchemy of Cinema

Written on September 1, 2015 at 12:07 am, by

The documentarian on white savior narratives, making enemies of gunrunners and governments, and nonfiction film as art.

In the Fictions of Our Past

Written on September 1, 2015 at 12:06 am, by

The authors discuss mourning in memoir and whether dreams belong in literature.

A Battle in Images

Written on September 1, 2015 at 12:05 am, by

Political posters and propaganda on view at LACMA shed light on a tumultuous period in Germany’s history, when art served as a catalyst for change.

Quicksand

Written on September 1, 2015 at 12:04 am, by

It’s an open secret that every officer, regardless of rank, is allowed to step in and ask for special consideration for one fuck-up.

The Boy from Petrópolis

Written on September 1, 2015 at 12:03 am, by

I look at his face; the green eyes, the wet mouth. I still feel the dream-softness of his hair under my hands; I feel like a grandmother, like a mother, like a lover.

my name is man

Written on September 1, 2015 at 12:02 am, by

i have torn myself down / my breezy bad mind

Army SMART Book Section 1-8: “The origin of the hand salute is uncertain.”

Written on September 1, 2015 at 12:01 am, by

Prove you’re mammalian by twisting / your neck a mere 160 degrees, / 180 if you’re under 30.

Reintroductions and Other Translocations

Written on August 17, 2015 at 12:09 am, by

The water had been empty and now was full. This felt like what we should be doing with our human urge to meddle in natural affairs.

We Can Try to Be Human

Written on August 17, 2015 at 12:08 am, by

The Israeli author on the dramatic family histories that fuel his work and the broken promises of his homeland.

Flight of the Ruler

Written on August 17, 2015 at 12:07 am, by

A transwoman in exile.

Just Out of Frame

Written on August 17, 2015 at 12:06 am, by

The journalist on the “strange, extractive” process of interviewing; second-, third-, and fourth-act stories; and coming to reporting as “a real, whole person.”

Music Meant to Change the World

Written on August 17, 2015 at 12:05 am, by

Folk City at the Museum of the City of New York dives into the politics and nostalgia of New York’s folk revival.

Train

Written on August 17, 2015 at 12:04 am, by

Now that she had shared a story, the Mother said, he must tell her one of his own. Something that had happened to him. He could tell that she meant something terrible.

The Vase

Written on August 17, 2015 at 12:03 am, by

I didn’t tell my husband, but there was a part of me that could have lived like that: eating cockroaches in the dirt, catching flies.

Now I understand what maturity is. Thank you, Wool!

Written on August 17, 2015 at 12:02 am, by

We had been asked to piece together the conspiracy using only wool.

White

Written on August 17, 2015 at 12:01 am, by

I do not / write about you for you / are not washed out.

Woven

Written on August 3, 2015 at 12:09 am, by

Every story I have ever told has a kind of breach to it, I think. You could say that my writing isn’t quite right. That all the beginnings have endings in them.

Burrow Down

Written on August 3, 2015 at 12:08 am, by

The Welsh novelist on badger baiting, human resonance in the natural world, and why he holds his breath while writing.

Waving, Not Drowning

Written on August 3, 2015 at 12:07 am, by

The New Yorker writer on the politics of surfing, reporting from war zones, and the “weird genre” of memoir.

Breaking the Silence

Written on August 3, 2015 at 12:06 am, by

Zanele Muholi’s stirring portraits of South Africa’s LGTBQI community.

Sisters and Spices

Written on August 3, 2015 at 12:05 am, by

The author on fiction as activism, feminism in Indian epics, and cooking to conjure a sense of home.

The Sum of Small Acts

Written on August 3, 2015 at 12:04 am, by

They agreed to unspoken rules. Broken windows were OK. Broken bones were fair game. Graffiti was acceptable, as were rubber bullets and tear gas.

The Boy Jihadi

Written on August 3, 2015 at 12:03 am, by

For a year or more before the six months that we spent preoccupied with our strange visitor, counterterrorism was our spiritual life.

Twelve Days of Wedding

Written on August 3, 2015 at 12:02 am, by

Your beauty is catching, / all my antelopes are on fire & ruined.

I Go for a Walk in the Evening While the Body Stays at Home

Written on August 3, 2015 at 12:01 am, by

The body unbuckles the door latch / and stands behind the screen.

Players for Democracy

Written on July 15, 2015 at 12:10 am, by

The author and historian on the legacy of slavery, queer love, and the coded language of desire in the nineteenth century.

The Rhino’s Last Stand

Written on July 15, 2015 at 12:09 am, by

Is domestication a final hope for the world’s rhinos?

Global Kleptocracy

Written on July 15, 2015 at 12:08 am, by

The foreign policy expert on global corruption, violent extremism, and how the West “has lost the balance between rectitude and liberty.”

Stars in My Pocket Like Bits of Data

Written on July 15, 2015 at 12:07 am, by

The poetics of information overload.

In Full Flight

Written on July 15, 2015 at 12:06 am, by

The writer and naturalist on the temporality of grief, inhabiting the voice of T.H. White, and developing radical empathy with a goshawk.

I Share, Therefore I Am

Written on July 15, 2015 at 12:05 am, by

Artist Mónika Sziládi examines the digital self.

Let Me Explain You

Written on July 15, 2015 at 12:04 am, by

Stavros Stavros was fat and full at the end of the night. All he needed now was to deflower a virgin.

Doubts and a Hesitation

Written on July 15, 2015 at 12:02 am, by

Who has dislocated the world? / and why are birds circling in our stomachs?

Preface to a Twenty-Volume Regicide Note

Written on July 15, 2015 at 12:01 am, by

Give me the names // of the slain. Say each name / like benediction.

Meakin Armstrong: Love’s Not Bulletproof

Written on June 23, 2015 at 9:01 am, by

A white Charlestonian says the recent shooting at Emanuel A.M.E. church is the inevitable outcome of white privilege.

The Boundaries of Taste

Written on June 15, 2015 at 12:13 am, by

A Guernica special issue.

A Measure of Worth

Written on June 15, 2015 at 12:12 am, by

Boundaries of Taste: The folklorist and curator on self-expression through adornment in African-American communities, and fashion as a political act.

The Fifth Flavor

Written on June 15, 2015 at 12:11 am, by

Boundaries of Taste: Umami gives identity and intricacy to mother’s milk, a bowl of ramen, a writer poised between Japan and America.

Social Fabric

Written on June 15, 2015 at 12:10 am, by

Boundaries of Taste: The Turner Prize-winning “transvestite potter” on the taste tribes of Britain.

The Rationalist

Written on June 15, 2015 at 12:09 am, by

Boundaries of Taste: Chased from his native India, Sanal Edamaruku contemplates the power of offense and accustoms himself to his new homeland.

Oenophilia

Written on June 15, 2015 at 12:08 am, by

Boundaries of Taste: The New York Times chief wine critic on the perils of connoisseurship and the pleasure in discovering one’s personal taste.

Death Is a Way to Be

Written on June 15, 2015 at 12:07 am, by

Boundaries of Taste: If we dance around our dead in New Orleans, it is because we have to.

Laugh Lines

Written on June 15, 2015 at 12:06 am, by

Boundaries of Taste: The comedian on her radical education and the importance of safe spaces in the “hostile and dangerous world” of joke-making.

The People’s Pervert

Written on June 15, 2015 at 12:05 am, by

Boundaries of Taste: The filmmaker and artist on the evolution of bad taste.

Inscape

Written on June 15, 2015 at 12:04 am, by

Boundaries of Taste: And as I parted my lips and then, later, my legs, watching the last clouds of smoke slip upward, I kept hearing my mother’s voice say, “Jesus is a fire.”

Canticle for Gigi Sauvageau

Written on June 15, 2015 at 12:03 am, by

Boundaries of Taste: Where we saw shape, line, and shadow—a nude—he saw a naked overweight woman.

robot nurse

Written on June 15, 2015 at 12:02 am, by

Boundaries of Taste: i love a good man / rebuilt after burnt to the ground

horror vacui

Written on June 15, 2015 at 12:01 am, by

Boundaries of Taste: stop & the Devil will push the Devil will be in me reborn

Murder in Uniform

Written on June 1, 2015 at 12:09 am, by

Kashmir’s most infamous “fake encounter” leaves five families desperate for justice.

Why Do You Have to Change?

Written on June 1, 2015 at 12:08 am, by

The essayist on unsentimental endings, Little House On the Prairie vs. Woody Allen, and why the conversation about not having kids “needs to be reframed.”

A Safe Distance

Written on June 1, 2015 at 12:06 am, by

The writer on myth-making as a means to confront the realities of modern-day slavery.

A Failure of Memory

Written on June 1, 2015 at 12:05 am, by

Three photographs chronicle the devastation surrounding the war against apartheid in South Africa.

Our Lady of Zeitoun

Written on June 1, 2015 at 12:04 am, by

Firas rested his head on the back of the sofa, lost in the smoke. He wondered what that meant: a world where you can run wild.

Pretty Is

Written on June 1, 2015 at 12:03 am, by

Only then can you forgive a girl for being pretty: if she’s an idiot or a liar.

Arroyo

Written on June 1, 2015 at 12:02 am, by

bones—to signal / I am human—stay away

waiting room

Written on June 1, 2015 at 12:01 am, by

you carry a heavier and heavier bag / and always feel it belongs to someone else

Unwanted Alive

Written on May 15, 2015 at 12:09 am, by

Since changes to US immigration law in the ’90s, many veterans are being deported.

Young, Gifted, and Black

Written on May 15, 2015 at 12:08 am, by

The author on the genius slave musician who inspired his novel and the fallacy of a post-racial America.

Playing Spaces

Written on May 15, 2015 at 12:07 am, by

The architect and writer on action as information, subtraction as growth, and indeterminacy as a practical protocol for design.

A Dangerous Language

Written on May 15, 2015 at 12:06 am, by

The Kurdish filmmaker on deploying a camera rather than a gun to fight for his community.

Shifting States

Written on May 15, 2015 at 12:05 am, by

What can two portraits of President-elect Muhammadu Buhari, taken three decades apart, tell us about Nigeria’s political climate?

The Edge

Written on May 15, 2015 at 12:04 am, by

She studied her face, looking for any change. A bad person. A cheat. A lesbian. A cheating, barren lesbian.

A Boy My Sister Dated in High School

Written on May 15, 2015 at 12:03 am, by

When the boy she was dating hit my sister, it made a sharp cracking sound, just like it does in the movies.

Prescription

Written on May 15, 2015 at 12:02 am, by

If gender, swim / parallel to shore.

The Self Forgives Little of Itself

Written on May 15, 2015 at 12:01 am, by

it’s as if the knuckle of tomorrow / has arrived today

Shattered

Written on May 1, 2015 at 12:08 am, by

Every day I expect to wake up and discover that the morphine has worn off, and that Richard is back to the man he was before the surgery. Instead, quiet.

Mythic Retreat

Written on May 1, 2015 at 12:07 am, by

The Booker Prize-winning author on samurai sword fights, the trouble with literary allusion, and the fabled world of post-Arthurian England.

The War of Forgetting

Written on May 1, 2015 at 12:06 am, by

Inspired by Eduardo Galeano, the discovery that all wars—personal, territorial, political—have afterlives in our grief and memory.

Jesus Days

Written on May 1, 2015 at 12:05 am, by

A photographer's images of a contented but closeted youth.

I’ll Die and Be Right There

Written on May 1, 2015 at 12:04 am, by

He told them about the Internet, Steam, Apple, and Microsoft, which were the other names of Satan.

The Baby

Written on May 1, 2015 at 12:03 am, by

“I hope you pathetic little boys are proud of yourselves!” she cried. “I honestly do!”

exodon paradoxus (bucktooth tetra)

Written on May 1, 2015 at 12:02 am, by

joypolice, even when there’s hunger and fear, we grab hold

The Door

Written on May 1, 2015 at 12:01 am, by

Where are you Salma? Little ache / of sky.

Journey to the Other

Written on April 15, 2015 at 12:08 am, by

The scholar and peace activist on Palestinian centrism, living as an exile, and learning from both Fatah and Israeli soldiers on the road to radical compassion.

Iowa Pastoral

Written on April 15, 2015 at 12:07 am, by

Unintended lessons from the acclaimed American writing program.

In Defense Of

Written on April 15, 2015 at 12:06 am, by

The “people’s lawyer” on her most controversial criminal defense cases—including the one that sent her to prison.

Raw Nerve

Written on April 15, 2015 at 12:05 am, by

The New Yorker’s art editor on learning English through imagery, comics as cultural barometer, and collaborating with Art Spiegelman.

Only Son

Written on April 15, 2015 at 12:04 am, by

“Some are really crazy,” the nurse said. “Others are just pretending.”

Wide Action Is Not a Width

Written on April 15, 2015 at 12:02 am, by

When women grew slender as church spires. I refused.

Roots

Written on April 15, 2015 at 12:01 am, by

I envied them in silence / because they were starting something.

The Cousins Karamazov

Written on April 1, 2015 at 12:10 am, by

The acclaimed writer on reporting fiction, listening to Martin Scorsese, and the family values in his new novel, The Whites.

The Tiger

Written on April 1, 2015 at 12:09 am, by

A Burmese poet and activist revisits the years of his incarceration, while urging change in a country that does not yet feel free.

Blood at the Root

Written on April 1, 2015 at 12:08 am, by

The Sri Lankan-American novelist on Sri Lanka’s brutal history and grappling with the right to tell the story of the country she left behind.

Built for Humans

Written on April 1, 2015 at 12:07 am, by

The sociologist on the role of the artist in gentrification, challenges to affordable housing, and the commodification of New York City’s loft lifestyle.

Escape, Release, and Return

Written on April 1, 2015 at 12:06 am, by

The artist reimagines Robin Beth Schaer’s poem, "Messenger."

This Huge Equilibrium

Written on April 1, 2015 at 12:05 am, by

On director Wim Wenders’s documentary The Salt of the Earth, a look at the career and conservation efforts of photographer Sebastião Salgado.

Stop Me If You’ve Heard This One Before

Written on April 1, 2015 at 12:04 am, by

Tanya was not surprised to find no one hiding behind the hedges when she looked out her window, but she was disappointed.

In the Dim Below

Written on April 1, 2015 at 12:03 am, by

Our parents were too busy launching bombs over the river to notice missing fingers.

Carousel

Written on April 1, 2015 at 12:02 am, by

The foal in its wet white bag / isn’t dead yet. Cue the cheery organ music.

Carib Woman, 1818

Written on April 1, 2015 at 12:01 am, by

I am burning in this life / and the next.

The Boundaries of Gender

Written on March 16, 2015 at 12:12 am, by

A Guernica special issue.

The Transformation of Mama Paulina

Written on March 16, 2015 at 12:11 am, by

Boundaries of Gender: This time around, Mama Paulina would marry a woman. She was not looking for a sexual relationship, but for a wife who would provide her with sons.

Boys Don’t Cry

Written on March 16, 2015 at 12:10 am, by

Boundaries of Gender: The psychologist on the evolution of maleness and the sociocultural forces that have long stifled men and fathers.

How to Be a Woman in Tehran

Written on March 16, 2015 at 12:09 am, by

Boundaries of Gender: I stay because, as my mother never stopped repeating, I am my own woman, but also my own man.

Girl

Written on March 16, 2015 at 12:08 am, by

Boundaries of Gender: Sometimes you don’t know who you are until you put on a mask.

Inflections Forever New

Written on March 16, 2015 at 12:07 am, by

Boundaries of Gender: The poet and cultural critic on the politics of motherhood and the expansive potential of the queer movement.

India’s Third Gender

Written on March 16, 2015 at 12:06 am, by

Boundaries of Gender: The activist on the ancient legacy and contemporary struggles of hijras.

Inside / Outside

Written on March 16, 2015 at 12:05 am, by

Boundaries of Gender: The artist discusses refugee trauma, female oppression, and her new show, How Iraqi Are You?

Wildlife

Written on March 16, 2015 at 12:04 am, by

Boundaries of Gender: He smiled, shyly, and then came toward Evan, and although in the red light the scars on Evan’s chest were not visible, Billy found them and kissed them.

Subcortical

Written on March 16, 2015 at 12:03 am, by

Boundaries of Gender: In the early seventies, I began sleeping with a married doctor who wanted to cure homosexuality.

Arcadia, Mars

Written on March 16, 2015 at 12:02 am, by

Boundaries of Gender: Not even the olive he wedged / under her tongue / could hold her, clot those cries—

The Body

Written on March 16, 2015 at 12:01 am, by

Boundaries of Gender: Because people you know sometimes cut theirs
 / off so as not to look like you.

Black Is the Color of My True Love’s Hair

Written on March 2, 2015 at 12:10 am, by

On interracial adoption in “post-racial” America.

Ethnographic Invention

Written on March 2, 2015 at 12:09 am, by

The novelist on the vivid life of Margaret Mead, a love triangle in the South Pacific, and the shared language of anthropology and fiction.

Fieldwork

Written on March 2, 2015 at 12:08 am, by

Lost and found in the femicide regions of the US-Mexico border.

The Contender

Written on March 2, 2015 at 12:07 am, by

The former New York gubernatorial candidate on misperceptions of big government, the poetry of politics, and why “it would be a tragedy if [Hillary] ran in an uncontested primary.”

The Art Of Agenting

Written on March 2, 2015 at 12:06 am, by

The literary agent on gatekeeping, the truth behind big advances, and why Amazon neglects the “humanity to good books.”

Red Brick

Written on March 2, 2015 at 12:04 am, by

Sam wants to see the Mississippi River at night. He has heard of Tom Sawyer and he looks for him in the faces of boys they pass.

My Dreams Would Seem So Close

Written on March 2, 2015 at 12:03 am, by

“They’re back!” we hissed over our kitchen fences. “Someone’s got to stop them! Something must be done!”

Reckoner

Written on March 2, 2015 at 12:02 am, by

back back back / to fowl becoming fish.

Dominion

Written on March 2, 2015 at 12:01 am, by

A mandrake quickens / into greed-grab, tears a page / from Genesis.

The Chair

Written on February 16, 2015 at 12:10 am, by

Dharamsala is the end of the journey for many Tibetans fleeing their Chinese-occupied homeland, and where their stories are told.

Syria in its Own Image

Written on February 16, 2015 at 12:09 am, by

The documentarian and journalist on the nation’s portrayal in the global media, the power of emergency cinema, and the role of the intellectual in revolution.

Narrating Crisis in Sri Lanka

Written on February 16, 2015 at 12:08 am, by

Humanitarian efforts may alleviate the pain, but do they stop the political strife that leaves victims bleeding?

Mitigating the Silence

Written on February 16, 2015 at 12:07 am, by

The author couldn’t find a single press in the world devoted to publishing African poetry. So he created one.

The Rabbit Slaughter

Written on February 16, 2015 at 12:06 am, by

An anthropologist examines the meanings of sacrifice and slaughter—with his own life as the case study.

The Perfect Beat

Written on February 16, 2015 at 12:05 am, by

Canonizing and continuing DJ Afrika Bambaataa’s hip-hop legacy

Afternoon Cowboys

Written on February 16, 2015 at 12:04 am, by

“Smith & Wesson .357 Magnum. Straight out of a Western movie.” He handed it over to Brady, who gripped the black rubber handle and ran a finger on the sleek, cold metal barrel.

Stormbringer

Written on February 16, 2015 at 12:03 am, by

I met Tracy Pasco in the spring of 1980—in my Pennsylvania hometown, a time of relative optimism and ease.

Corpse Flower

Written on February 16, 2015 at 12:02 am, by

Blooms one day a year. Let wolves / suck marrow from the bones of boys.

Halfway Through Life

Written on February 16, 2015 at 12:01 am, by

We who crossed paths with the bomber / and lived the whole afternoon through.

We Contain Multitudes

Written on February 2, 2015 at 12:08 am, by

The trans author and journalist on masculinity and male privilege, writing about the body, and crafting new narratives about gender identities.

My Asylum

Written on February 2, 2015 at 12:07 am, by

After more than a century, Britain’s notorious asylums were slated for closure. Where does that leave the people they actually healed?

Just to Tell the Truth

Written on February 2, 2015 at 12:06 am, by

The journalist and teacher on a century of muckrakers, the pleasures and perils of reporting, and the golden age of investigative journalism.

Slowly, and With Much Expression

Written on February 2, 2015 at 12:05 am, by

Alec Soth’s Songbook.

Gramophone

Written on February 2, 2015 at 12:04 am, by

First there was a little crackle as the pin scratched the record and then the voices would begin to sing or talk and would float into the surrounding inky darkness.

The Infernal

Written on February 2, 2015 at 12:03 am, by

"I consider myself a casualty, one of the many casualties of the war on terror." —Alberto Gonzales

Co-Operative

Written on February 2, 2015 at 12:02 am, by

you don’t think of Vermont / when you think full-blown heroin crisis. / I don’t see why not but I’m not from here.

Terrorists Speak in Strange Languages

Written on February 2, 2015 at 12:01 am, by

I lock my tongue / even though I’ve prayed / in Persian for a thousand years.

When the Waves Overturned Grief

Written on January 15, 2015 at 12:09 am, by

Ten years after the Indian Ocean tsunami, remembering normalcy and chaos in the province of Aceh.

Inhabiting Language

Written on January 15, 2015 at 12:08 am, by

The award-winning Catalan writer on political attempts to repress his native language, inventing stories to tell the truth, and the powers and pitfalls of memory.

What the Trees Reveal

Written on January 15, 2015 at 12:07 am, by

When we moved to the Ella Valley, my partner and I took great care not to build on land that might have belonged to Palestinians before the war of 1948.

The Hollywood Blacklist, Revisited

Written on January 15, 2015 at 12:06 am, by

The filmmaker and scholar on the radical legacy of American Communist film.

Before the Eclipse

Written on January 15, 2015 at 12:05 am, by

The photographer’s recent images of Havana.

Indigo Gets Married

Written on January 15, 2015 at 12:04 am, by

“I thought you’d get along.” “Why did you think that?” I say. “You do so well with wounded men,” she says.

Other Cities

Written on January 15, 2015 at 12:03 am, by

There were so many places he could have lived, but he lived in the shack so he could dream of his daughter.

Blankout

Written on January 15, 2015 at 12:02 am, by

Brother we are legion here.

Rats

Written on January 15, 2015 at 12:01 am, by

It is a rat world. / You only live to keep them out / or on the way.

Religion in America: Gods and Devils

Written on December 15, 2014 at 12:12 am, by

A Guernica special issue.

Yo Soy el Diablo

Written on December 15, 2014 at 12:11 am, by

Religion in America: The Devil as part of a rather American tradition.

God’s Creation Is Running a Fever

Written on December 15, 2014 at 12:10 am, by

Religion in America: The climate scientist on denialism and why her evangelical faith demands action.

What Will Happen to All of That Beauty?

Written on December 15, 2014 at 12:09 am, by

Religion in America: Why does our humanity mean we are at once of God and utterly separate from Him?

Whole Self Movement

Written on December 15, 2014 at 12:08 am, by

Religion in America: The transgender rabbi on religious rituals, gender fluidity, and the language of LGBTQ inclusion.

What We Are Now, You Shall Be

Written on December 15, 2014 at 12:06 am, by

Religion in America: The Hare Krishna monk on cultural stereotypes, teaching faith through food, and America’s obsession with yoga.

Of This Time

Written on December 15, 2014 at 12:05 am, by

Religion in America: The artist discusses Hinduism in the diaspora, religious imagery, and her new show, Eyes of Time.

Amituofo

Written on December 15, 2014 at 12:04 am, by

Religion in America: If he were superstitious, he would have blamed the monks for cursing him.

Household Gods

Written on December 15, 2014 at 12:03 am, by

Religion in America: The house of the Memory God is filled with junk in piles. It started innocently enough, the way a blizzard starts: a flake here, a flake there.

Messenger

Written on December 15, 2014 at 12:02 am, by

Religion in America: The choice left was to be lost. / I climbed cloud-high to answer.

God suspected my heart was a geode but he had to make sure

Written on December 15, 2014 at 12:01 am, by

Religion in America: good, God said, I took clouds and planted them / in soft, red clay.

Mallika Kaur, Harpreet Kaur Neelam, and Kirpa Kaur: Sikh Feminism and SAFAR

Written on December 12, 2014 at 9:56 am, by

Daring to celebrate an egalitarian tradition.

Lucy McKeon: The Meaning of Coincidence

Written on December 11, 2014 at 10:09 am, by

Religion in America: Jung’s concept of synchronicity was supposed to help us understand the world’s more wondrous events. Then Self-Help hijacked the idea to make it all about us.

The Limits of Jurisdiction

Written on December 1, 2014 at 12:09 am, by

For the past six years, Karen has lived in Missouri with her adoptive parents. But a Guatemalan couple are convinced the child is their kidnapped daughter, Anyelí.

The Everyday Extraordinary

Written on December 1, 2014 at 12:06 am, by

The poet and curator on expanding autobiography, the importance of elegy, and the centrality of blues to experience.

Festival for the Pigs

Written on December 1, 2014 at 12:04 am, by

Soon a rumor spread through the city that a pig was riding on another pig, circling through the streets, commanding the riot.

Butterflies in November

Written on December 1, 2014 at 12:03 am, by

You’ll barely notice him, he won’t nag or pester you, doesn’t even sing the way other kids do.

The Easement

Written on December 1, 2014 at 12:02 am, by

to startle / one dead to what living’s no longer worth.

Hopper’s Women

Written on December 1, 2014 at 12:01 am, by

she, standing there now with all the immodest strength / of a clapboard house, who has not even asked for this light.

Blackness as the Second Person

Written on November 17, 2014 at 12:09 am, by

The National Book Award finalist on chronicling everyday racism, the violence inherent in language, and the continuum from Rodney King to Michael Brown.

Humane Endeavor

Written on November 17, 2014 at 12:07 am, by

The surgeon and public health journalist on the gaps in healthcare policy, the sharp elbows of politics, and dignity in end-of-life care.

Salvaged Crossings

Written on November 17, 2014 at 12:06 am, by

Unearthing the stories of “coolie women”—early-twentieth-century indentured laborers shipped from India to work on sugar plantations across the colonial world.

The Self-Portraits of Samuel Fosso

Written on November 17, 2014 at 12:05 am, by

Examining identity through costume, impersonation, and performance.

Gulf Return

Written on November 17, 2014 at 12:04 am, by

Only for a short time, my mother promised when she left, but the shortness has grown longer, many years, almost twelve, and I am now grown.

Seven Micro-Stories on War (and Only One on Love)

Written on November 17, 2014 at 12:03 am, by

We reported on the two-way radio that the only nut alive asked to surrender.

Kafka Erases His Father With Moonlight

Written on November 17, 2014 at 12:02 am, by

Moonlight poured fiery poison into my life.

Said Gun Sleeps

Written on November 17, 2014 at 12:01 am, by

I’d sleep against the wall in the unemployment line / next to men who slit throats in another country

Violently Wrought

Written on November 3, 2014 at 12:08 am, by

The author of A Brief History of Seven Killings on Bob Marley, writing terror explicitly, and why sloppiness serves good storytelling.

The Junk Trade

Written on November 3, 2014 at 12:07 am, by

I could still feel his touch, and each time I thought about his truck I felt guilty.

Verses of Love and War

Written on November 3, 2014 at 12:06 am, by

The writer on the faces of violence in conflict zones, and why poetry offers a form of liberation that journalism cannot.

The Darling Duck

Written on November 3, 2014 at 12:05 am, by

One of many recipes inspired by centuries of yearning for the eternal duck.

Becoming

Written on November 3, 2014 at 12:04 am, by

She hugged me goodbye and left in her boat. I didn’t wait for the boat to grow smaller. I walked into the jungle. I wanted to be something real.

Stand Still

Written on November 3, 2014 at 12:03 am, by

We realize, of course, that one day the force may strike again, leaving one of us breathless at the side of the road.

In Which Forest

Written on November 3, 2014 at 12:02 am, by

you gripped the axe’s handle, forever poised / to make a mark

Luz

Written on November 3, 2014 at 12:01 am, by

If, in the church, there was blood / her blood was colorless

The Arc of Possibility

Written on October 15, 2014 at 12:08 am, by

The longtime Beijing correspondent on the roots of dissent in Hong Kong, China’s “Me” generation, and the precarious expansion of Chinese civil society.

Soldier Girl

Written on October 15, 2014 at 12:07 am, by

Looking back on a fifteen-year career as a Tamil Tiger.

We Wear the Mask

Written on October 15, 2014 at 12:06 am, by

The writer on coming of age in dichotomous Baltimore and being warned against writing about race.

In the Prison of New Beginnings

Written on October 15, 2014 at 12:05 am, by

In the South’s bloodiest prisons, Baptists say they can reform prisoners by turning them into missionaries.

Choosing Their Histories

Written on October 15, 2014 at 12:04 am, by

The curator discusses her preference for non-linear perspectives and truly independent thinkers.

Ghost House

Written on October 15, 2014 at 12:03 am, by

The stories of the kidnapped always begin the same way.

Elegy With Agency

Written on October 15, 2014 at 12:02 am, by

You can no more waterboard yourself / than sneak up on yourself at a party

the years

Written on October 15, 2014 at 12:01 am, by

where does dark begin settling / my little bones.

American Empires: Power and Its Discontents

Written on October 1, 2014 at 12:12 am, by

American Empires: A Guernica special issue.

The Rise and Fall of Public Housing in NYC

Written on October 1, 2014 at 12:11 am, by

American Empires: A subjective overview.

Hippocratic Bloat

Written on October 1, 2014 at 12:10 am, by

American Empires: A journalist and a cardiologist discuss healthcare gone haywire and how Americans are medicating themselves to death.

The Chicken Competition

Written on October 1, 2014 at 12:07 am, by

American Empires: How poultry companies concentrate wealth and pit farmers against each other in a secretive tournament pay system.

Pull Back to Reveal

Written on October 1, 2014 at 12:06 am, by

American Empires: The privacy advocate and legal advisor to Edward Snowden on today’s surveillance empire.

For What Purpose?

Written on October 1, 2014 at 12:04 am, by

American Empires: I wanted to stop something, everything. I applied for a job in airport security and they placed me here.

Wounding Radius