Noise Runs documentary still

Every month, Guernica’s multimedia editor, Mary Wang, selects a new documentary as part of our partnership with Social Impact Media Awards (SIMA). These works were produced by filmmakers around the globe, but are united in their commitment to advancing social justice through compelling narratives and captivating imagery.

Watch our selections below.

The Walls, directed by Gonzalo Escuder and Nacho Gómez

The setting is Coyote Ridge Corrections Center, where the prison’s debate team joins forces with students from Washington State University to discuss gun control, even though many of the incarcerated debaters have landed there precisely for firearm-related crimes.

Noise Runs, directed by Ashley Panzera and Kim Borba.

In the aftermath of the 2010 Haiti earthquake, failed reconstruction has pushed social unrest to the breaking point. Protests erupt in the streets, and armed UN soldiers stalk the angry crowds. But a group of young Haitians, driven by their passion for a new Haiti, is sparking social change. To democratize information and offer hope to the population, they produce a radical newspaper, Bri Kouri Nouvèl Gaye (Noise Travels, News Spreads).

SIMA is a 501(c)3 tax-exempt arts organization. It exists to advance global awareness, social justice, human rights and education by supporting filmmakers on the front-lines of social change. SIMA started as the first and only international media competition honoring achievements in the creative, human rights and humanitarian fields. Today, SIMA is the most renowned global curator in the social impact space, serving independent film, academic and global social justice industries around the world. The organization now consist of several programs, including SIMA Classroom, SIMA RAMA and SIMAx, which all have the purpose of affecting change through social impact cinema.

Mary Wang

Mary Wang is the multimedia editor of Guernica. She runs the Miscellaneous Files interview series, in which she talks to writers about their practice through the screenshots, notes, and other digital marginalia found on the writer's devices.

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